RiskMeter ONLINE™

Test Descriptions & Availability

 

For property underwriters and agents who are looking to increase accuracy, productivity and overall speed of operations, the RiskMeter Online is an Internet application used to automate property risk reports.  By simply typing in an address, underwriters and agents can get back natural hazard information for a given policy location.  The RiskMeter can perform more than 30 different lookups, including distance to coast, rating territory, flood zone, windpool eligibility, proximity to brush and EQ hazards.  Unlike conventional paper-based lookups, the RiskMeter Online provides underwriters and agents with accurate, efficient and defendable positions up to 90% faster than existing methodologies.  To learn more about our reports, please click on the links below.

 

Distance to Shore

Distance to Earthquake Faults

FEMA Flood Zone Determinations

Florida Police Pension Fund City Codes

Flood Elevation

Hail Exposure Index

Florida Fire Pension Fund City Codes

County

State Wind Pool Eligibility

Distance to Fire Station

Tornado Exposure Index

California Brush Fire Zones (Renie Ad Map)

City (MCD)

Fire Protection Code (FPC)

California Brush Fire Zones (Bates & SRA)

Protection Class

CDS Wildfire Hazard Model

California Earthquake Authority (CEA)

Tier 1 Counties

EQECAT Earthquake Score

US Quick Quake Assess (Basic)

US Landslide

AP (Alquist-Priolo) Fault Zones

California Landslide / Liquefaction

US Wildfire

Crime Scores

Premium Tax Codes

Slope / Aspect / Elevation

Sinkholes

Sinkhole Integrated

Florida Wind Loss Mitigation Maps

Aerial Images / Birdseye Geocoding

ABAG Liquefaction

Fire Perimeters

Rating Territory (Customer Defined)

Tsunami Inundation Areas

Hawaii Lava Flow Hazard Zones

California PML Zones 

Coastal Storm Surge

Policy Exposure Module

EQE Probable Maximum Loss

EQE Average Annual Loss

Roof Age

EQE Ground Shaking

Flood Risk Score

Straight Line Wind

Wildfire Risk Score

Guaranteed Flood Determinations

Wind Probability

Coastal Storm Risk Score

Mine Subsidence

Hail Probability

Lightning Risk Score

Major System Permits

CoreLogic Premium Tax

Hail Insight™

 

 

Distance to Shore 

This report shows the distance to the coast.   This can be tailored to meet your needs in 2 ways: 1) The shoreline can be customized to meet your underwriting requirements.  This means the coastline can be edited to remove insignificant water.  2) You can determine what distances you want to check (Ex. 100ft, 500ft, 1000ft, 2500ft, 1 mile, etc. or 1/10th of a mile up to 10 miles).  Speak to CDS about implementing these items.

 

Fields:  Description, Index and Within.

 

Description:  This is a text statement describing the distance to the nearest shoreline (ex: Within 1 mile to shore).

Index:  When setting up an account, CDS can set the distances to check: (i.e. ½  mile, 1 mile, 2 mile, etc). This number tells how many distances it has checked.

* Note - Generally companies set a maximum distance that they are interested in checking (i.e. once you’re more than 10 miles inland, its not considered a coastal risk).  We include the message “Outside of risk zone,” if the property is not within a meaningful distance of the risk.

Within:  This states how far the property is from the shoreline according to the distance measure selected during the setup of the account.  This is the actual distance checked.

                       

Availability:  All coastal States (Atlantic, Pacific and the Gulf Coast)

 

Special Features/Options:

A custom shoreline can be developed for your account so that only water that your company considers coastal will be used.  You can determine how far to go up rivers/inlets, whether to consider the Intra Coastal Waterway coastal, etc.  Contact your CDS representative for details.


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Rating Territory (Customer Defined) 

These are custom rating territories that are defined by each insurance company. We can convert all of your paper definitions into digital maps.  This will allow you to accurately determine the rating territory for any address, whether your territories are built by ZIP Code, cities and towns, or defined by roads or rivers.  This works using street-level mapping technology for unparalleled accuracy.  Contact CDS about adding your rating territories.  Generally, companies provide CDS with paper definitions, and CDS creates a digital copy of the rating territories, accurate down to the street level.

 

Fields:  Description and Zone.  Custom fields can be added, too.

 

Description:  This is a physical description of the zone that makes up the territory.

Zone:  This is the code that identifies the territory.

 

Availability:  Entire US, if set up for individual company (Call CDS to have your territories set up).

 

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FEMA Flood Zone Determinations

This report shows whether or not the address entered falls into a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA – The 100-year flood plain, or 1% probability of flooding each year), as well as a FEMA Flood Zone. The FEMA source data has been updated and significantly enhanced. We have reviewed and Quality Checked (QC’d) 100% of the panel information.  In addition, we continually update this information, and it is downloaded into the Risk Meter Online monthly.  This is an excellent screening tool if you're concerned with properties falling within flood-prone areas.

 

Fields:   Fields:  SFHA, Within 250 Feet, Community Number, Community Name, Zone, Panel, Panel_dte, COBRA, FIPS Code and Census Tract

 

SFHA:  Special Flood Hazard Zone – This is the 100 year floodplain.  This is generally what people refer to as being “In a Flood Zone.” Returns In or Out, telling whether or not the property falls within the SFHA zone.

Within 250:  If the property is within 250’ of the SFHA boundary, it tells you.  Because of minor sources of error, if the property is outside a flood zone, but within 250’ of one, this method is not accurate enough to make a definitive determination.  A property site visit or certification by a flood service should be used to make an absolute determination.

Community Number:  A 6-digit standardized community code defined by FEMA.

Community Name:  Name of the community         

Zone:  The type of flood zone as specified by FEMA.

Panel:  The panel number of the paper map associated with this flood zone area.

Panel_dteThe panel date. This is the date that the map was produced and/or last updated, whichever is newer.  Formatted as (month, day, year).

COBRA:  Coastal Barriers Resource Act of 1982 removed federal government support for building and development in undeveloped portions of hazardous coastal areas. Returns In or Out, telling you whether or not the property falls into a COBRA zone.

FIPS Code:  The FIPS (Federal Information Processing Standard) standardized county code.

Census Tract:  Census tracts are small, relatively permanent statistical subdivisions of a county or statistically equivalent entity delineated by local participants as part of the U.S. Census Bureau’s participant statistical areas program.

 

Availability:  Entire US, where available.  FEMA does not provide maps for every community in the US.  However, CDS covers all areas where FEMA maps are available.

 

Special Features/Options:

 

The Base Flood Elevation can be returned from the FEMA flood maps where available. 

 

As an option, CDS can also tell you the distance to high risk zones, such as A Zones.  You can specify a list of zones that you are concerned with.  This will tell you if you are near a high-risk zone or if you are not in one.

 

*Additionally, using the Flood Report along with the aerial images and manual placement, you can ensure that your structure is being plotted in exact location.

 

Flood Zone Definitions and Explanations
If you're not exactly sure what a particular zone means, check out our Flood Zone definitions and explanations at:
http://www.riskmeter.net/RiskMeter/floodzon.htm

 

RiskMeter Online FEMA Flood Map Updates

To see the latest FEMA map revisions digitally updated on the RiskMeter Online, please go to: http://www.riskmeter.com/riskmeter/flood_updates.htm

 

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Flood Elevation

This report builds upon the standard Flood Report. However, in addition to the flood data, the report also identifies flood risks that are nearby. The idea is to identify flood risks that may be present even if the location is not in a flood zone. If the location
falls outside of a flood zone, the report calculates the distance to the nearest 100 year flood zone, and estimates the height of the location above the flood zone. If the location falls within a flood zone, the report estimates what the water depth would be during the 100 year flood.

 

The official Base Flood Elevation (BFE) is used if there is one on the FEMA map. However, these are not available for all 100 year flood zones. A Base Flood Elevation is the elevation of the surface of the water when flooded. If there is no BFE on the map, CDS has developed a proprietary method to determine the BFE. This is done with a combination of the flood data and the elevation data.

Some answers may seem odd, which are attributable to the elevation data and corresponding flood information. This is due to differences in the elevation data, which is provided by the USGS. USGS elevation data in general has an accuracy of +/- 2 meters, or about 6 feet. However, it is still very valuable to know if the location is near a flood zone, and the difference in elevation is small. Again, these are due to minor inconsistencies in the elevation data, but the information is still very useful in raising awareness of possible underwriting concerns. For example, on some occasions the height above the flood zone may be negative, or the water depth may be shown as a negative number. This is because by chance, the elevation of the location is very close to the elevation of the flood zone. In either case, it means that this location is at risk of flooding, as there is very little difference in elevation..

FieldsSFHA, Community Number, Community Name, Zone, Panel, Panel Date, COBRA, Distance to Flood Zone, Elevation, BFE, BFE Source, Height Above BFE, Estimated Water Depth

SFHA:  Special Flood Hazard Zone – This is the 100 year floodplain. This is generally what people refer to as being “In a Flood Zone.” Returns In or Out, telling whether or not the property falls within the SFHA zone.
Community Number:  A 6-digit standardized community code defined by FEMA.
Community Name:  Name of the community
Zone:  The flood zone as specified by FEMA.
Panel:  The panel number of the paper map associated with this area.
Panel date:  The panel date. This is the date that the map was produced and/or last updated, whichever is newer. Formatted as (month, day, year).

COBRA:  Coastal Barriers Resource Act of 1982 removed federal government support for building and development in undeveloped portions of hazardous coastal areas. Returns In or Out, telling whether or not the property falls into a COBRA zone.

Distance to Flood Zone:  This field gives the distance to the nearest 100-year flood zone in increments.
Elevation: 
This is the elevation at the location entered (subject property) in feet above sea level.

BFE:  This is the Estimated Base Flood Elevation (eBFE). This is the estimated elevation of the water’s surface when at the 100 year flood level. This is not shown (N/A) if the subject property is too far from the nearest flood plain. By default, a property whose closest flood zone is greater than 1,500 feet will see the N/A result.

BFE Source:  This tells if the source of the BFE is FEMA or CDS. If it says FEMA, it was taken from the flood map. If it says CDS, it was calculated by CDS using proprietary methods.

Height Above BFE:  This is the height above the flood zone. It is the difference between the elevation and the estimated BFE. In general this is a positive number. If the number is small or negative, this indicates a risk of flooding. Negative numbers are due to minor accuracy issues in the elevation data. This is only shown if the location falls outside of the 100 year flood zone. This is not shown (N/A) if you are too far from the nearest flood plain.

Estimated Water Depth:  This is the estimated depth of the water if this location was flooded to the 100 year flood level. This is the difference between the elevation of the location and the estimtated BFE(eBFE). This is only shown if the location falls within a 100 year flood zone.

*Note - If the location is far away from the nearest 100 year flood plain, then the Estimated BFE and Height above BFE fields are not calculated, as they would probably be of little practical use. In these cases, the Estimated BFE and Height Above BFE will say “N/A”.


Availability:  Entire US, where available. FEMA does not provide maps for every community in the US. However, CDS covers all areas where FEMA maps are available.

Special Features/Options:

The maximum distance to return the Estimated BFE and Height above BFE can be set to different distances. Contact CDS if you have any questions.

By default, CDS calculates the distance to all 100-year flood zones; i.e. all A and V zones. However, we can use specific distances, or also give the distance and height above other zones, like the 500 year flood plain.

*Using our Flood Elevation Report along with our aerial images and manual placement tool will help you to ensure the structure is being plotted in exact location.

Flood Zone Definitions and Explanations
If you're not exactly sure what a particular zone means, check out our Flood Zone definitions and explanations at:
http://www.riskmeter.net/RiskMeter/floodzon.htm

RiskMeter Online FEMA Flood Map Updates

To see the latest FEMA map revisions digitally updated on the RiskMeter Online, please go to: http://www.riskmeter.com/riskmeter/flood_updates.htm

 


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Distance to Earthquake Faults

This report shows the distance to the nearest fault. The data is provided by United States Geological Survey (U.S.G.S.).  You can set the parameters as to how far from the fault you are concerned with.

 

Fields:  Within (Distance).

 

Within:  This states how far the property is from the Earthquake fault according to the distance measure selected during the setup of the account.  When setting up an account, CDS can set the distances to check: i.e. ½  mile, 1 mile, 2 mile, etc.  This is a textual description (i.e. “Within 1 Mile of EQ Fault”) 

*Note - We include an outside of risk zone message if the property is not within meaningful distance of the risk

 

Availability:  Entire US.

 

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Florida Fire Pension Fund City Codes

This report shows what tax district the address entered falls into. In the state of Florida certain municipalities and fire districts have set up premium taxes that must be reported by insurers. These taxes require you to report to the state the total premiums for each jurisdiction code. The Tax Code District files accurately reflect the boundaries of each jurisdiction, for both the fire and public safety jurisdictions.

 

Fields:  Fire Tax Code, Name, County, Fire

 

Fire Tax Code:  This is the proper jurisdiction code that should be used as defined by the State of Florida Dept. Of Insurance

Name:  This is the name of the jurisdiction.

County:  This is the county

Fire:  This tells if it falls within a fire jurisdiction

 

Availability:  State of Florida Only

 

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Florida Police Pension Fund City Codes

This report shows what tax district the address entered falls into. In the state of Florida, certain municipalities and police districts have set up premium taxes that must be reported by insurers. These taxes require you to report to the state the total premiums for each jurisdiction code. The Tax Code District files accurately reflect the boundaries of each jurisdiction, for both the fire and public safety jurisdictions.

 

Fields:  Police Tax Code, Name, County, Police

 

Code:  This is the proper jurisdiction code that should be used as defined by the State of Florida Dept. Of Insurance

Name:  This is the name of the jurisdiction.

County:  This is the county

Police:  This tells if it falls within a police jurisdiction

 

Availability:  State of Florida Only

 

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State Wind Pool Eligibility

 This report shows whether or not the address entered falls into the state defined wind pool area. In areas with a tiered wind pool, the report will also tell what eligible area the property falls within.

 

Fields:  Wind Zone

 

Wind Zone:  This says whether a property is “In” or “Out” of a state wind pool.  If the wind pool is tiered, it will tell which pool the property is eligible for.

 

Availability:  AL, FL, GA, MS, NC, NJ, SC, TX.

 

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Hail Exposure Index

This report gauges the potential for hail damage for any location in the Continental US.  It is based on National Climatic Data Center figures for the last twenty one years (1990 - 2010). By simply typing in an address, you will receive:

 

Fields:  Hscale, Hpercentile, Storms Per Year, Hail Score

 

HscaleThis is a number between 1 - 100 that represents the frequency of hail storms from 1990 - 2011.  For example, the national average is 6 (equates to 2.3 hail storms/year), so any Hscale number higher than that is more likely to have hail.

HpercentileThis is a percentile score that compares your lookup to the rest of the US.  For example, a score of 10 means that it is in the lowest 10% of all areas in the US, or a score of  80 means that your lookup is in the top 20% compared to all areas in the US.

Storms Per Year:  This is the average number of storms per year for the area.  The national average is 2.3 hail storms per year.

Hail Score:  This is the hail score based upon the number of storms per year.  The scores can be interpreted as follows:

 

0                     No Risk - No Storms

1                    Low Risk – Less than 2 storms per year

2                    Average Risk – 2 to 3 storms per year

3                    Elevated Risk – 3 to 5 storms per year

4                    High Risk – 5 to 15 storms per year

5                    Extreme Risk – More than 15 storms per year

       

Availability: Continental US.

 

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Tornado Exposure Index

 This report gauges the potential for tornado damage for any location in the Continental US.  It is based on National Climatic Data Center figures for the last twenty one years (1990 - 2010). By simply typing in an address, you will receive:

 

Fields:  Tscale, Tpercentile, Storms per Year and Tornado Score

 

TscaleThis is a number between 1-100 that represents the frequency of tornado events from 1990 - 2011.  Currently, the national average is 8 (equates to 0.33 tornadoes per year), so any Tscale number higher than that is more likely to have a tornado occur.

TpercentileThis is a percentile score that compares your lookup to the rest of the US.  For example a score of 10 means that it is in the lowest 10% of all areas in the US, or a score of 80 would mean that it is in the top 20% of all areas in the US.

Storms Per Year:  This is the average number of storms per year for the area.  The national average is 1 tornado every 3 years or 0.33 tornados per year

Tornado Score:  This score is based upon the number of tornados per year.  The scores can be interpreted as follows:

 

0                     No Risk - No Storms

1                     Below Average Risk - Less than 1 tornado every 5 years on average

2                     Average Risk – Approximately 1 tornado every 3 to 5 years on average

3                     Elevated Risk – Approximately 1 tornado every 1 to 2 years on average

4                     High Risk – 1 to 2 tornadoes per year on average

5                     Extreme Risk – More than 2 tornadoes per year on average

 

Availability:  Continental US.

 

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County

This report shows in which county the address entered is located.

 

Fields:  County and FIPS.

 

County:  Name of the county.

FIPS:  Federal Information Processing Standard - The standardized code corresponding to the county.

 

Availability:  Entire US.

 

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City (MCD) 

This report shows in which city or town the address entered is located.  These cities and towns are referred to as minor civil divisions (MCDs).  These are the official town boundaries as defined by government entities.  This has recently been changed.  In states where significant development and annexations occur, this can look at cities and unincorporated areas.

 

Fields:  City

 

City:  This is the name of the city, or unincorporated area.

 

Availability:  Entire US.

 

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Distance to Fire Station 

This report will give you the driving distance to the three closest fire stations, names of the stations and staffing (professional, volunteer or a combination).  This report uses routing technology to determine the distances to the stations (This is not a guesstimate)!

 

Fields:  Distance, Station, Staffing and RMID

 

Distance:  This will give you the distances of the three closest fire stations

Station:  Returns the name of the fire station

Staffing:  Tells you if the station is career, volunteer or a combination

RMID:  Serial number which helps us to identify a particular fire station

 

Availability:  National

 

 

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California Brush Fire Zones (Bates & SRA) 

This report shows whether or not a property falls into a brush fire zone.  For this test, the California Department of Forestry and local governing agencies provide the information.  These are the Very High Fire Hazard Severity Zones (VHFHSZ) as defined by the “Bates Bill”.

 

Fields:  BF Bates, BF Proximity and BFSRA.

 

BF Bates:  This tells if a property is located in an area identified as a brush fire hazard. Brush fire hazard areas are those identified by the “Bates Bill.”  It will say whether or not the property is “IN” or “OUT” of the hazard area.

BF Proximity:  This shows how close a property is to a brush fire zone. If a property falls outside of a brush fire hazard area, this tells how far away the property is from the closest brush fire hazard.

*  Note - Generally companies set a maximum distance that they are interested in checking (i.e. once you’re more than 1 mile away, it is not considered a wildfire risk).  We include the message “Outside of risk zone,” if the property is not within a meaningful distance of the risk.

BF SRA:  State Responsible Zone – These are non-federal lands for which fire protection is provided by the State of California or the federal government. These are areas identified by state and local governments as potential brush fire hazards, and local municipalities are not responsible for fighting fires!

 

Availability:  State of CA

 

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California Brush Fire Zones (Renie Ad Map) 

This report shows whether or not a property falls into a brush fire zone.  This data is a digital version of the popular “Renie Ad Map” books that have been used for decades by insurers to identify brush hazard areas, as well as the Fire Protection Class for a given location.

 

Fields:  RF Results, Proximity

 

RF Results:  This tells if a property is located in an area identified as a brush fire hazard. Brush fire hazard areas are those identified by the Renie Ad Map map books. It will say whether or not the property is “IN” or “OUT” of the hazard area.

* Note - Generally companies set a maximum distance that they are interested in checking (i.e. once you’re more than 1 mile away, it is not considered a wildfire risk).  We include the message “Outside of risk zone,” if the property is not within a meaningful distance of the risk.

Proximity:  This shows how close a property is to a brush fire zone. If a property falls outside of a brush fire hazard area, this tells how far away the property is from the closest brush fire hazard.  These distances can be set according to the distances you want to check. 

 

Availability:  6 counties in CA.  Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Santa Barbara, Ventura

 

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CDS Wildfire Hazard Model 

The CDS Business Mapping Wildfire Hazard Model is the quick and accurate way for you to determine the potential risk of brush fires for properties in the western United States. Our model begins with detailed vegetation data and classifies the fuels by burn potential. The CDS Model separates potential risk into four classes, ranging from very low to high. You should use these maps to identify properties that are vulnerable to brush fires. The CDS Wildfire Hazard Model will give you a complete picture of brush hazards.  Base vegetation data was provided by the CA Department of Fire and Forestry Protection and other government and proprietary sources.

 

Fields:  Brush Results, Proximity

 

Brush Results:  This is the brush rating for the location where the property is located.  It returns one of the following four values:

 

¨       Extremely Low

¨       Low

¨       Medium

¨       High

 

Proximity:  This shows how close a property is to an area rated as a risk.  The idea here is that if you are not in a high risk area, you would like to know if you are near one. These distances can be set according to the distances you want to check.  CDS can also set this to check for both medium and high, or simply high-risk areas.

* Note - Generally companies set a maximum distance that they are interested in checking (i.e. once you’re more than 1 mile away, it is not considered a wildfire risk).  We include the message “Outside of risk zone,” if the property is not within a meaningful distance of the risk.

 

Availability:  AK, AZ, CA, CO, FL, ID, MT, NM, NV, OR, SD, TX, UT, WA and WY.

 

Special Features/Options:

 

The brush report is highly configurable.  First, the distances to check for proximity can be customized for each account.  In addition, you can decide whether to check the proximity to only high risk areas, or medium and high risk areas.  Also, we can allow small patches of brush to be allowed (using percentage thresholds), while eliminating large areas.  Different thresholds can be used for different distances, too.  Finally, for agents who write for many different carriers, CDS can give back separate distances for the distance to medium and the distance to high, so that the agent can see which carriers will accept the risk.

 

When used in conjunction with the aerial images/Birdseye Geocoding, this can be an incredibly powerful tool for you to evaluate brush exposures.

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Fire Protection Code (FPC) 

This lookup shows what the fire protection code is for the address entered. They are based upon fire districts and municipalities. CDS Business Mapping takes the paper definitions as provided by the Renie Ad Map books.

 

Availability:  6 counties in CA (Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Santa Barbara and Ventura). 

 

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Protection Class 

This lookup shows what the fire protection code is for the address entered. They are based upon fire districts and municipalities, as defined by the Mississippi Rating Bureau (MSRB).

 

Fields:  City, County, Protected, Unprotected

 

City:  Name of the municipality

County:  Name of the county

Protected:   Protection class for protected homes

Unprotected:  Protection class for unprotected homes

                                                                                 

Availability:  State of Mississippi.

 

 

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California Earthquake Authority (CEA) Zone Determination 

This lookup provides the insurer with the proper CEA Zone.  CEA zones are set up by the California Earthquake Authority to determine rates for homeowners insurance.

 

Availability:  State of CA.

 

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US Quick Quake – Assess (Basic) 

Specifically geared for underwriters, this tool provides the local soil conditions, the name and distance to the closest fault, identification of the controlling fault and the resulting MMI at the site. The account can be set to return values for a 100, 250 or 500 year return period.  In areas of low EQ risk, not all fields will be returned. Fields that may be returned are as follows Soil, Magnitude, Peak Ground Acceleration, MMI, Controlling Fault, Distance to Controlling Fault, Closest Fault, Distance to Closest Fault and Score.

 

An important note on the EQE methodology used. The model looks at faults that are active faults.  An active fault in the model is a fault that is expected to rupture with a given probability within the return period chosen.  For example, if a fault is not expected to rupture, within say, 100 years, and the return period chosen is 100 years, that fault will not be shown in the output.  It is statistically insignificant.  Because of this fact, known faults may not be shown in the output (because they are not expected to rupture within the return period), or different answers for the same location are possible based upon different return periods.

 

Also important to note is that full data will only be returned in areas where there is statistically significant seismic activity and an active fault.  Areas with inactive faults (based upon the return period selected) will only return the soil type (and the score, if US Quick Quake – Score if selected).

 

Fields:  Soil, Magnitude, Peak Ground Acceleration, MMI, Controlling Fault, Distance to Controlling Fault, Closest Fault and Distance to Closest Fault.

 

Soil:  Returns one of the following values:

 

¨       Rock

¨       Soft Rock and Very Dense Soil
¨       Stiff Soil
¨       Soft Soil

 

Magnitude:  This is the magnitude of the "design-basis" earthquake at the controlling fault.  In other words, it is the largest magnitude expected at the controlling fault during the selected return period.

Peak Ground Acceleration (g):  Intensity is a measure of how strongly the ground is shaken by an earthquake.  Because some types of ground shake more than others, the intensity can vary from place to place in an earthquake, even within the same neighborhood.  The measure of intensity is the peak ground acceleration (PGA) in unit of "g" or gravity.  A value of 0.5 represents a peak ground acceleration of half the acceleration of gravity.

Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI):  This scale uses the observations of the people who experienced the earthquake to estimate its intensity. There are 12 levels of observation represented by a roman numeral equivalent. 1 (Low) – 12 (High).  See further descriptions below:

Controlling Fault:  Name of the fault producing the greatest damage at the site

Distance to Controlling Fault (Mi):  Distance in miles from a site to the controlling fault from a group of hypothetical faults selected for analysis.

Closest Fault:  Name of the closest fault to the site.

Distance to Closest Fault (Mi):  Distance in miles from a site to the closest fault from a group of hypothetical faults selected for analysis.

 

MMI Scale Definitions:

 

Mercalli Intensity
(at epicenter)

Magnitude

Witness Observations

1 (I)

1 to 2

Not felt. Marginal and long period effects of large earthquakes.

2 (II)

2 to 3

Felt by persons at rest, on upper floors, or favorably placed.

3 (III)

3 to 4

Felt indoors. Hanging objects swing. Vibration like passing of light trucks. Duration estimated. May not be recognized as an earthquake.

4 (IV)

4

Hanging objects swing. Vibration like passing of heavy trucks; or sensation of a jolt like a heavy ball striking the walls. Standing motor cars rock. Windows, dishes, doors rattle. Glasses clink. Crockery clashes. In the upper range of IV, wooden walls and frame creak.

5 (V)

4 to 5

Felt outdoors; direction estimated. Sleepers wakened. Liquids disturbed, some spilled. Small unstable objects displaced or upset. Doors swing, close, open. Shutters, pictures move. Pendulum clocks stop, start, change rate.

6 (VI)

5 to 6

Felt by all. Many frightened and run outdoors. Persons walk unsteadily. Windows, dishes, glassware broken. Knickknacks, books, etc., off shelves. Pictures fall off walls. Furniture moved or overturned. Weak plaster and masonry D (See masonry definitions below) cracked. Small bells ring (church, school). Trees, bushes shaken (visibly, or heard to rustle).

7 (VII)

6

Difficult to stand. Noticed by drivers of motor cars. Hanging objects quiver. Furniture broken. Damage to masonry D, including cracks. Weak chimneys broken at roof line. Fall of plaster, loose bricks, stones, tiles, cornices (also unbraced parapets and architectural ornaments). Some cracks in masonry C. Waves on ponds; water turbid with mud. Small slides and caving in along sand or gravel banks. Large bells ring. Concrete irrigation ditches damaged.

8 (VIII)

6 to 7

Steering of motor cars affected. Damage to masonry C; partial collapse. Some damage to masonry B; none to masonry A. Fall of stucco and some masonry walls. Twisting, fall of chimneys, factory stacks, monuments, towers, elevated tanks. Frame houses moved on foundations if not bolted down; loose panel walls thrown out. Decayed piling broken off. Branches broken from trees. Changes in flow or temperature of springs and wells. Cracks in wet ground and on steep slopes.

9 (IX)

7

General panic. Masonry D destroyed; masonry C heavily damaged, sometimes with complete collapse; masonry B seriously damaged. (General damage to foundations.) Frame structures, if not bolted, shifted off foundations. Frames racked. Serious damage to reservoirs. Underground pipes broken. Conspicuous cracks in ground. In alluvial areas sand and mud ejected, earthquake fountains, sand craters.

10 (X)

7 to 8

Most masonry and frame structures destroyed with their foundations. Some well-built wooden structures and bridges destroyed. Serious damage to dams, dikes, embankments. Large landslides. Water thrown on banks of canals, rivers, lakes, etc. Sand and mud shifted horizontally on beaches and flat land. Rails bent slightly.

11 (XI)

8

Rails bent greatly. Underground pipelines completely out of service.

12 (XII)

8 or greater

Damage nearly total. Large rock masses displaced. Lines of sight and level distorted. Objects thrown into the air.

 

 

Masonry Definitions:

 

Masonry A:  Good workmanship, mortar, and design; reinforced, especially laterally, and bound together by using steel, concrete, etc.; designed to resist lateral forces.
Masonry B:  Good workmanship and mortar; reinforced, but not designed in detail to resist lateral forces.
Masonry C:  Ordinary workmanship and mortar; no extreme weaknesses like failing to tie in at corners, but neither reinforced nor designed against horizontal forces.
Masonry D:  Weak materials, such as adobe; poor mortar; low standards of workmanship; weak horizontally.

                               

Full descriptions are from: Richter, C.F., 1958. Elementary Seismology. W.H. Freeman and Company, San Francisco, pp. 135-149; 650-653.

 

Availability:  Continental US

 

 

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EQECAT Earthquake Score

The EQE Earthquake Score is designed to give the underwriter a simple, quantitative score to evaluate the overall earthquake risk for a given location.  The score takes into account the effects of ground shaking, as well as event frequency.  This report will return a score from 1 (very low) to 10 (high). 

 

Fields:  Score

 

Score:  The possible values for the earthquake score are:

 

 

Risk Score

Definition

10

Extremely high risk - within the highest 1% of risk among all US properties within the same line of business

9

Very high risk - between the 96th and 99th percentiles of risk among all US properties within the same line of business

8

Very high risk - between the 88th and 96th percentiles of risk among all US properties within the same line of business

7

High risk - between the 72nd and 88th percentiles of risk among all US properties within the same line of business

6

Moderate risk - between the 50th and 72nd percentiles of risk among all US properties within the same line of business

5

Moderate risk - between the 28th and 50th percentiles of risk among all US properties within the same line of business

4

Low risk - between the 12th and 28th percentiles of risk among all US properties within the same line of business

3

Very low risk - between the 4th and 12th percentiles of risk among all US properties within the same line of business

2

Very low risk - between the 1st and 4th percentiles of risk among all US properties within the same line of business

1

Extremely low risk - within the lowest 1% of risk among all US properties within the same line of business

 

 

Availability: Entire US

 

 

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AP (Alquist-Priolo) Fault Zones 

This report shows you whether or nor a property falls into an Alquist-Priolo Fault Zone. AP Fault Zones are designated by the California Department of Mines & Geology as areas near active faults. These are areas adjacent to faults, and therefore likely to be damaged by earthquakes. This is also a requirement for disclosure on CA real estate transactions.

 

Fields:  Alquist-Priolo

 

Alquist-Priolo: The results will be either in or out.

 

Availability:  State of CA

 

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US Landslide 

This report returns the relative landslide hazard for the selected location.  Two measures are used to identify areas at risk for landslides:  incidence and susceptibility.  It was created using data published by the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Landslide Hazards Program. Incidence and susceptibility were determined by evaluating a geologic formation map of the United States overlaid with the locations of known landslides.  Incidence refers to the frequency and severity of previous (historical) landslides. Susceptibility uses a variety of geographic factors to identify areas thought to be at risk of future slides.

 

The total percentage of an area historically impacted by land sliding was used to determine its incidence rating as high (more than 15%), medium (1.5%-15%), or low (less than 1.5%).   Susceptibility was determined by modeling the probable response of the landscape to cutting or loading of slopes and anomalously high precipitation. The descriptions below suggest that the two measures are not always consistent.  However, it seems to suggest that past experience (incidence) is more important than expected results (susceptibility).  Therefore, categories are not exhaustive.  Only one of the two factors need be present to be of concern.

 

Fields:  Slide_att

     

High Susceptibility & Incidence:  High susceptibility to landsliding and moderate incidence.

High Susceptibility:  High susceptibility to landsliding and low incidence.

High Incidence:  High landslide incidence (more than 15% of the area has been involved in landsliding).

Moderate Susceptibility and Low Incidence:  Moderate susceptibility to landsliding and low incidence.

Moderate Incidence:  Moderate landslide incidence (1.5 - 15% of the area is involved in landsliding).

Low Incidence:  Low landslide incidence (less than 1.5 % of the area is involved in  landsliding) and susceptibility.

No Data:  No data exists for these areas.

 

Availability: Contiguous 48 states

 

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US WildFire 

The data was created considering the effects of vegetation, relative humidity, precipitation, temperature and slope. The data was generated using 1km grid squares. There are several basic components of the EQECAT Wildland fire risk rating model. The wildfire burn model incorporates the effects of vegetation fuel load (including moisture content and burning characteristics) and temporal effects such as wind speed, wind direction, and seasonal humidity to develop a measure of fire risk. These components are considered in developing the Wildland Fire Rating Risk Score which provides a stable metric for comparing wildland fire risk nationwide.

 

Fields:  FireDanger

 

FireDangerThis returns wild fire ratings of:

 

¨        Very Low

¨        Low

¨        Medium

¨        High

   

Availability:  Continental US.

 

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California Landslide/Liquefaction 

This report tells you whether or not the property in question is in or out of a landslide or liquefaction area. These very-high resolution maps were developed by the State of California to identify areas prone to landslides and liquefaction. To date, only key areas around Los Angeles and San Francisco have been mapped, with more areas to be added later. This is standard disclosure item for California real estate transactions.

Liquefaction is a phenomenon in which the strength and stiffness of a soil is reduced by earthquake shaking or other rapid loading. Liquefaction and related phenomena have been responsible for tremendous amounts of damage in historical earthquakes around the world. Liquefaction occurs in saturated soils, that is, soils in which the space between individual particles is completely filled with water. This water exerts a pressure on the soil particles that influences how tightly the particles themselves are pressed together. Prior to an earthquake, the water pressure is relatively low. However, earthquake shaking can cause the water pressure to increase to the point where the soil particles can readily move with respect to each other.

Earthquake shaking often triggers this increase in water pressure, but construction related activities such as blasting can also cause an increase in water pressure. When liquefaction occurs, the strength of the soil decreases and, the ability of a soil deposit to support foundations for buildings and bridges is reduced. Liquefied soil also exerts higher pressure on retaining walls, which can cause them to tilt or slide. This movement can cause settlement of the retained soil and destruction of structures on the ground surface.


Fields:  Type

Type:  The results can be:

 

¨       High Landslide Probability Risk of landslide exists

¨       High Liquefaction Probability Risk of Liquefaction exists

¨       High Landslide/Liquefaction Probability Risk of both landslide/liquefaction exist

¨       Out No known landslide/liquefaction risk

Availability:  State of CA (limited areas – Mainly around San Francisco and Los Angeles)

 

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Premium Tax Codes
In several states, you are required to collect taxes on insurance premiums, and report the taxes collected by jurisdiction to the state.  Jurisdictions can be a combination of counties, cities, towns, villages and fire districts, so getting the correct codes can be difficult.  The RiskMeter has made this process simple!  We have mapped the tax jurisdictions for AL, DE, FL, GA, IL, KY, LA, NJ, NY, SC, TX, so all you need  to do is enter the address and the official codes and jurisdictions are returned!  The states require similar yet different data, so the returned information may vary by state. A few of the states are explained below:

 

 

Florida

In the state of Florida, certain municipalities and fire districts have set up pension funds funded by premium taxes that must be collected and reported by insurers. These are known as the Florida Fire and Police Pension Tax Codes.  These taxes require insurers to report to the state the total premiums for each jurisdiction. The Tax Code files accurately reflect the boundaries of each jurisdiction, for both the fire and public safety jurisdictions.  Taxes are not due in all areas.  In areas where no tax is due, a code of 999 has been assigned, and the Tax field says NO.  Also note that Florida has two codes for each area, one for fire and one for police. They may be the same or different!

 

This data was garnered from a variety of sources.  The official tax code schedules were obtained from state agencies, and then maps were collected outlining each jurisdiction. TIGER 2000 files were used for city boundaries, unless newer digital city boundaries were available for state or county sources.  Fire district maps, where needed, were sourced from local government sources, and were a combination of paper and digital maps.

 

Fields:  Code, Name, County, Tax, Type

 

Code:  This is the proper jurisdiction code that should be used as defined by the State of Florida Dept. Of Insurance

Name:  This is the name of the jurisdiction

County:  This is the county name

Tax:  This tells if you must collect taxes in this jurisdiction

Type:  This tells if this is the Fire or Police Code (They can be the same or different)

 

South Carolina

These are the official tax codes for the State of South Carolina.  They are defined by county.  Official Census digital county files were used.

 

Fields:   Line_Number, County, FIPS

 

Line_NumberThis is the official jurisdiction code

County:  This is the county name

FIPS:  This is the 5 digit official federal FIPS code for the county

 

Illinois

Over 1,100 premium tax jurisdictions exist in the state of IL, and they are a combination of cities, towns, MCDs, villages and fire districts.  Where fire districts were involved, paper maps were digitized.  City, town, MCD and village maps were used from TIGER 2000.  City boundaries were cut out of fire districts where necessary, and the digital boundaries were used where conflicts occurred (it was considered more reliable).  Please note: There also may be minor coding problems at the edges of jurisdictions because the maps were digitized.  4 Digit codes are used in IL, and a code of 9999 was assigned to areas were taxes are not collected.

 

Fields:  Code, Name, County

 

Code:  This is the proper jurisdiction code that should be used

Name:  This is the name of the jurisdiction

County:  This is the county name

 

 

Louisiana

These are the official taxing jurisdictions for the state of Louisiana.  Three digit codes are assigned to all areas of the state.  TIGER 2000 digital city and county files were used to construct the maps.

 

Fields:  Code, Name, County

 

Code:  This is the proper jurisdiction code that should be used as defined by the State of Louisiana Dept. Of Insurance

Name:  This is the name of the jurisdiction

County:  This is the county (parish) name

 

 

Kentucky

These are the official taxing jurisdictions as defined by the state.  Kentucky is one of the more complicated states, as there are many different tax rates, and jurisdictions may be counties, cities or a combination of both. A code of 999 has been assigned to areas where no taxing jurisdictions exist. The fields shown below are the default output.  Additional fields, including tax rates for each jurisdiction are available.  Call CDS if you are interested in adding these to your output.

 

Fields:  Tax_Code, City_Code, Name, Place, County, FIPS

 

Tax_CodeThis is the proper jurisdiction code that should be used as defined by the State of Kentucky Department Of Insurance

City Code:  This is the official city code assigned by the state

Name:   This is the name of the jurisdiction

Place:  This is the place code assigned by the state

County:  This is the county name

FIPS:  This is the 5 digit official federal FIPS code for the county

 

Availability:  AL, DE, FL, GA, IL, KY, LA, NJ, NY, SC, TX

 

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Crime Scores 

These crime scores (Part of the CrimeRisk™) are used as predictors of crime vulnerability throughout the United States.  This data is provided by Applied Geographic Solutions (AGS).  These CrimeRisk scores are predictors of the rates of serious crimes at the neighborhood (block) level.    The crime scores are based upon the strong relationship that exists between a neighborhood's social makeup (demographics) and the amount of crime that is perpetrated there. By combining surrounding social characteristics, estimating demographic changes and actual crime statistics, we are able to provide precise scores indicating a site's risk of crime in comparison to national averages.

 

This data is a predictor of crime vulnerability, and gives scores of 1-2,000 based against the national average of 100.  So if the score is 50, the crime rate is expected to be half that of the national average, or if the score is 300, the rate is expected to be three times the national average.  These are current year estimates.  Individual and aggregate scores are given for different types of crimes.

 

Content

 

CrimeRisk is a geographic database consisting of a series of standardized indexes for a range of serious crimes against both persons and property. It is derived from an extensive analysis of several years of crime reports from the vast majority of law enforcement jurisdictions nationwide. The crimes included in the database are the “Part 1” crimes and include: murder, rape, robbery, assault, burglary, theft and motor vehicle theft. These categories are the primary reporting categories used by the FBI in its Uniform Crime Report (UCR). Part II crimes are not reported in the detail databases and are generally available only for selected areas or at high levels of geography.

 

In accordance with the reporting procedures using the UCR reports, aggregate indexes have been prepared for personal and property crimes separately, as well as a total index. While this provides a useful measure of the relative “overall” crime rate in an area, it must be recognized that these are unweighed indexes, in that a murder is weighed no more heavily than a purse snatching in the computation. For this reason, caution is advised when using any of the aggregate index values.

 

Methodology

 

The primary source of CrimeRisk was a careful compilation and analysis of the FBI Uniform Crime Report databases. On an annual basis, the FBI collects data from about 16,000 separate law enforcement jurisdictions at the city, county, and state levels and compiles these into its annual Uniform Crime Report (UCR). While useful, the UCR provides detailed data only for the largest cities, counties and metropolitan areas. Virtually all jurisdictions nationwide participate in the UCR program.

 

In order to undertake the analysis, AGS obtained detailed jurisdictional level data for the years 1990 through 1996 (the latest year currently available) and supplemented these detailed statistics with 1999 preliminary UCR statistics at the State level and for cities and metropolitan areas where those have been released. We are now using UCR data from 1996-2013. The preliminary 2004 release data was used to balance the models to the latest available data.

 

A wide range of 1990 Census and current year demographic attributes was extracted from AGS’ databases for the remaining areas (approximately 8,500 separate “jurisdictions”). This database was then used as the primary modeling database and was used later for scaling. Each of the seven crime types was modeled separately, using an initial range of about 65 socioeconomic characteristics (race and ethnicity are not used in building these scores.) taken from the 1990 Census and AGS’ current year estimates. Separate models were constructed for each of the nine Census regions (e.g. New England, East North Central, Pacific) in order to account for regional differences in crime rates and the demographic characteristics which underlay them. The models constructed typically accounted for over 85% of the variance in crime rates at this “jurisdiction” level, although it should be noted that the results for property crimes were generally more reliable than for personal crimes.

 

The results of these models were then applied to the block group level using the same demographic attributes compiled at the block group level. The resulting estimates were then scaled to match the master database of 8,500 jurisdictions. For cities, the block groups within each city were scaled to match the city total. For areas outside of these cities (or for smaller centers), results were scaled to match the county total after adjusting for those cities scaled separately. The final crime rate estimates were then weighted by population and aggregated to the national totals. The results were then scaled to match the 2004 preliminary estimates (at a state level) and converted to indexes relative to the national total.

 

 

Fields:  Aggregate Crime Index, Homicide, Rape, Robbery, Assault, Burglary, Larceny, Motor Vehicle Theft, Violent Crimes, Property Crimes

 

Aggregate Crime Index – Overall crime score

 

Violent Crimes (Combines the 4 below)

 

¨       Murder

¨       Rape

¨       Robbery

¨       Assault

 

Property Crimes (Combines the 3 below)

 

¨       Burglary

¨       Larceny

¨       Motor Vehicle Theft

 

* Note - Violent Crimes and Property Crimes are aggregate indexes.  For Violent Crimes, the indexes for murder, rape, robbery, and assault are combined, then re-indexed. For Property Crimes, burglary, larceny, and motor vehicle theft indexes are combined, then re-indexed to 100.

 

Availability:  Entire US.

 

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Sinkholes 

This report provides vital information about the proximity to known sinkholes. For the requested address you will get the number of sinkholes within the area, the distance to the closest sinkhole and details about the closest sinkhole(s).  Several databases were merged together to compile the RM sinkhole database, and duplicate events were eliminated. The merged database contains approximately 3,000 sinkholes reported and confirmed from 1970 to 2013. The key sources used for the sinkhole data include:

 

¨       SW Florida Water Management District

¨       Florida Sinkhole Research Institute

¨       Florida Geological Survey

 

CDS believes this is the most comprehensive sinkhole database available today.

 

Fields:  Number of Sinkholes within XX miles, Distance to Closest Sinkhole, Ref_num, Date, Depth_ft

 

Number of Sinkholes within XX miles:  This is the number of sinkholes within a given radius. The distance is a parameter that can be set for each account.  Contact CDS to change the distance for your account.  Additionally, more than one radius can be used.      

Distance to Closest Sinkhole:  This is the distance to the closest sinkhole.  In addition, these distances can be customized to meet your underwriting requirements.

Ref_numThis is an individual ID assigned to each sinkhole

Date:  This is the date the sinkhole occurred.

Depth_ftThis is the depth of the sinkhole in FT

 

Details on the closest sinkhole(s) is(are) shown.

 

Availability: FL, PA

 

Special Features/Options:

 

CDS Sinkhole Clearinghouse

 

In an attempt to get a better handle on where all the sinkholes are located, CDS has initiated a sinkhole clearinghouse. Individual carriers submit information on their known sinkholes, which are only shared by other participating carriers. In this way, CDS can provide a more complete picture of sinkhole risks than any individual carrier could get by themselves. This gives participating companies access to hundreds of extra, confirmed sinkholes.

 

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Sinkhole Integrated

This report uses ground composition data, a comprehensive database of known sinkholes, and a proprietary methodology developed by a team of PhD-level scientists that analyzes soil and other factors that contribute to catastrophic ground collapse.  In addition to risk level, the Sinkhole Integrated report also provides distance and status of sinkholes within user defined distances from the subject property. 

 

This comprehensive report is a great way for users to gain more insight into sinkhole risk.  

 

Fields: Risk Description, Risk Level, Distance Closest Sinkhole Miles, Closest Sinkhole Count, Closest Sinkhole Status, Closest Sinkhole Reference Number, Closest Sinkhole Date Verified, Sinkholes Within # Miles, Within # Miles Verified, Within # Miles Non Sinkhole, Within # Miles Under Investigation, Within # Miles Verified Non Sinkhole Paid.    

 

     

Risk Description: Risk of a sinkhole occurring. Possible values are:  Low | Moderate | High | Very High.

Risk Level: Risk level based on a scale of 1-4.  1= Low Risk | 2 = Moderate Risk | 3 = High Risk | 4 = Very High Risk.        

Distance Closes Sinkhole Miles: Distance to the closest potential sinkholes in miles.

Closest Sinkhole Count: Total number of closest potential sinkholes identified in relation to property location.

Closest Sinkhole Status: Status of investigation for the closest potential sinkholes identified.  Possible values are:

o Claim Investigated Verified Non Sinkhole – A claim was filed but not paid because no sinkhole was verified.

o Claim Investigated Verified Sinkhole – A claim was filed and paid for a verified sinkhole.

o Claim Under Investigation – A claim was filed and there is not a final determination as to whether a sinkhole is present.

o Claim Investigated Verified Non Sinkhole Paid – A claim was filed and verified that a sinkhole was NOT present, however, the claim was still paid because an additional engineering study would be required and was cost prohibitive.

Closest Sinkhole Reference Number: CoreLogic reference number for closest sinkholes.

Closest Sinkhole Date Verified: Date that the closest sinkholes were verified.

Sinkholes with # Miles: Total number of potential sinkholes located within the defined search radius. 

Within # Miles Verified: Total number of verified sinkholes located within the defined search radius.  

Within # Miles Non Sinkhole: Total number of potential sinkholes that have been identified not to be a sinkhole within the defined search radius.

Within # Miles Under Investigation – Total number of potential sinkholes still under investigation within initial search radius.

Within # Miles Verified Non Sinkhole Paid: Total number of potential sinkholes verified as not being a sinkhole but which a claim was still paid within the defined search radius.

 

Availability:  State of Florida

 

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Slope/Aspect/Elevation 

CDS has recently added slope, aspect and elevation.  This data is derived from the National Elevation Data set (NED) recently released by the USGS.  The grid size (distance between readings) in the NED range varies from 10 to 100 meters, depending on the area.  The best data available is always used.  The three columns shown below are given for the location.  Additionally, the RiskMeter provides the minimum, maximum and average reads for slope and elevation within a given radius (usually 250’ unless specified by the user).  The min, max and average are shown in case the house is located very near a steep slope.  Additionally, since this data is based upon gridded values, the slope and elevation may not be exact for very small areas.  However, in general, they should be accurate.

 

Fields:  Slope, Aspect and Elevation

 

Slope:  This is the slope at the location.  This is shown as the degrees slope.

Aspect:  This is the direction that the slope is facing.  This is the direction you would look if you were facing away from the hill.

Elevation:  This is the elevation of the location in feet.

 

Availability:  National

 

Special Features/Options:

 

The radius to use for the slope and elevation statistics (min., max., avg.) can be set by CDS for your account. Contact CDS if you would like to change the radius.

 

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Florida Wind Loss Mitigation Maps 

This report brings back the three critical pieces of information needed by insurers to meet requirements for the new Florida Wind Loss Mitigation Credits program. Insurers must use these maps to apply discounts in accordance with this new mandate expected to be in effect starting January 1, 2004. The 3 maps are as follows:

 

¨       Windborne Debris Regions

¨       Windspeed Region

¨       High Velocity Hurricane Zones (Also known as Terrain B&C Regions)

 

Fields:  Type, Result

 

Type:   This field identifies which of the 3 pieces of information above is being returned.  This will say High Velocity Wind Region, Windspeed Region, and Windborne Debris Region.

Result:  This field gives the required information for the category shown above.  Here are the expected values for each type of result: 

 

¨       Windborne Debris Region – In or Out. 

¨       Windspeed Region – A numerical value (MPH). 

¨       High Velocity Wind Region – Terrain B or Terrain C

 

Availability:  State of Florida

 

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Aerial Images/Birdseye Geocoding

 These are fairly recent aerial/satellite photos.  A second map will appear to the right of the RiskMap.  This can be turned on from the “Show Aerial Map” checkbox on the address verification/pick reports screen, or by clicking on the “Birdseye Geocoding” icon next to the map.  There are several key features and pieces of information to note.  First, the aerial map matches the aerial in size and scale of the RiskMap to the left.  As the user zooms in, out, or pans around the map, the two maps will stay in synch! 

 

Additionally, there is an icon underneath the aerial map that says “More Info.”  Clicking on this brings up another small window.  There are several items of note in the window.  First is the Date field.  This is the date of the photograph.  The second field is the Data Resolution field. This is the size of each pixel in the picture in Meters.  The smaller the pixel size, the further that you can zoom in without losing detail. 

 

Aerial Information:  Although the images cover the entire US, the resolution varies, and is generally best in major cities.  Additional updated, high-resolution images are added regularly.

 

Special Features/Options:

 

The aerial images are not only pictures, but can be used as powerful tools, too.  The term “Birdseye Geocoding” (patent pending) refers to the fact that when used with the manual placement tool, the aerial image can be an amazing tool for pinpointing the exact risk location.  If the point where the RiskMeter puts the subject is not correct, you can use the manual placement tool and click on the aerial map (or RiskMap) to move the subject.  Not only does the RiskMeter move the subject, it actually re-calculates the results!  Therefore, if you can pinpoint the location on the aerial photo, you can be sure you’re getting accurate results.

 

Availability:  Entire US.

 

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Tier 1 Counties

 Tier 1 counties are counties that border the coastline.  They are used by many insurers and reinsurers to quickly and broadly identify coastal risks.

 

Fields:  Tier1

 

Tier1:  Yes or No.  Yes, if it is a coastal county.  No, otherwise.

 

Availability:  Entire US.

 

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ABAG Liquefaction:

These are very detailed liquefaction potential maps of the San Francisco Bay Area.  These maps are known as the de-facto standard, and are posted on the ABAG (Association of Bay Area Governments) Web site.  These maps, although generally considered to be from ABAG, were actually developed by the USGS.

 

Fields:  Liquefaction, Ptype

 

Liquefaction:  Rates liquefaction into five buckets.  The categories are as follows:

 

¨        Very Low

¨        Low

¨        Medium

¨        High

¨        Very High

 

Ptype:  This is a detailed breakdown of the type of soil found at the location

 

Availability:  9 counties surrounding the San Francisco Bay, including: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma.

 

Special Features/Options:

 

When used in conjunction with the aerial images/Birdseye Geocoding, this can be an incredibly powerful tool for underwriters to evaluate earthquake exposures.  You can use the Birdseye geocoding to ensure that the risk is located properly, and use the manual placement option to get site level earthquake analyses.

 

 

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Fire Perimeters:
The fire extents test tells you if the address falls within an area that was burned by a previous fire. The dataset covers the early 1900’s through 2003 in the state of California, and 2002-03 for the rest of the United States.

 

Fields: State, County, Fire_Name, Fire_Number, Year

State – Returns state which the fire took place
County – This is the county where the fire took place
Fire_Name – Tells you the name of the fire
Fire_Number – Serial number which helps us to identify a particular fire
Year – This field indicates when the fire took place

 

States Available: Entire US

 

Special Features/Options:

When used in conjunction with the CDS Wildfire Model, this test can provide insight into which areas are the most fire prone.


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Tsunami Inundation Areas

RiskMeter’s Tsunami Evacuation Zones currently cover the states of California (Partial), Hawaii, Oregon and Washington (Partial). Based upon sophisticated models, this report identifies areas that could be inundated if a tsunami occurs in the Pacific Ocean.

 

California Tsunami Data

This data was created in a joint venture by USC Tsunami Research Center, California Office of Emergency Services and the California Geological Survey. Recognizing the need for more accurate tsunami data for Emergency Planning, the team modeled tsunami events along populated coastal areas of the state which totals 1/3rd of California’s coast. The maximum inundation line was derived from USGS DEM’s and the wave creation model MOST. Along the coast, 90m DEM data was used; 30m DEM data was used in harbors.

 

Areas that would be inundated (under water) have a status of IN.  Study areas that would not be flooded are flagged as OUT.  Areas inland, that are not susceptible, are also flagged as OUT.

 

For areas of the coast that were not modeled (non or sparsely populated), the status is N/A.  In these regions, areas along the coast were flagged as N/A if the elevation was below 100’.  If the elevation was more than 100’ in elevation, and/or there is no way for the water to reach it, the area is flagged as OUT.  So for example, a valley inland that is below 100’ would not be flagged as a potential problem, because the water couldn’t reach it.

 

Fields:  Status, County, Description

 

Status:  In, Out, N/A

County:  Name of the county

Description:  Description of the status

 

Sources:  USC Tsunami Research Center, California Office of Emergency Services and California Geological Survey

 

Availability:  Populated areas along the CA coast

 

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Hawaii Tsunami Data

This dataset was created by the State of Hawaii Civil Defense Agency, and it covers the entire state.These are the official Tsunami Evacuation Areas as defined by the State of Hawaii Civil Defense. The methodology was developed at the University of Hawaii for determining the maximum expectable inundation of Hawaii’s shores from worst-case tsunamis.  It’s drawn upon records compiled by the Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research over many years.  This historical data is used in mathematical analyses to predict maximum wave heights along the coast; these heights are then used in numerical models involving the topography (land contours) to map the inundation of each location.

 

In coordination with the Civil Defense officers on each island, a final map was prepared showing the actual evacuation zones. The zones extend inland from the inundation limit to the nearest landmark such as a road, which can be used by public and police to identify the areas which must be evacuated to ensure safety.

 

Fields:  Status, Island, Mapnum, Mapname

 

Status - In or Out

Island - Island Name

Mapnum - Official Map Number (from paper maps)

Mapname - Official Map Name (from paper maps)

 

Source:  State of Hawaii Civil Defense Agency

 

Availability:  6 Islands (Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Lanai, Maui, Hawaii)

 

Vintage: September 1998

 

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Oregon Tsunami Data

This dataset was created by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries and covers the entire coast of Oregon. The vintage of this data is December 2000. These inundation maps were created to prepare individuals in the event of a large undersea earthquake event that occurs on the Cascadia Subduction Zone system. The areas were modeled against an 8.8 magnitude earthquake/tsunami event.

 

Fields:  Status, County

 

Status: In, Out, N/A

County: Name of the county

 

Source:  Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries

 

Availability:  State of Oregon

 

Vintage:  December 2000

 

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Washington Tsunami Data

These study areas were created by modeling two different earthquake scenarios that would take place off the coast of Washington. This joint project was headed by the Washington Department of Natural Resources and the Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology. The tsunami evacuation zones include “Areas inundated by a moderately high run up from the modeled Cascadia Subduction Zone tsunami”, scenario 1A with asperity includes areas “inundated with high runup from the modeled Cascadia Subduction zone tsunami.” Only certain areas were mapped.  Areas that would be affected by rising waters have a status of IN, whereas areas that would stay dry are flagged as OUT.  Areas that were not studied, and may be susceptible, are shown as N/A. 

 

Fields:  Status, County, Description

            

Status: In, Out, N/A

County: Name of the county

Description: Area and scenario used for modeling

 

Source:  Washington Department of Natural Resources & Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology

 

Availability:  Portions of Jefferson County, King County, Island, Whatcom, Grays Harbor, Skagit, Snohomish, and Clallam counties were included in the study. The entire coast of Pacific County was mapped.

 

 

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Hawaii Lava Flow Hazard Zones

These are the official hazard zones for the Island of Hawaii as defined by the US Geological Survey.  Hazard zones from lava flows are based chiefly on the location and frequency of both historic and prehistoric eruptions. "Historic eruptions" include those for which there are written records, beginning in the early 1800's, and those that are known from the oral traditions of the Hawaiians. Our knowledge of prehistoric eruptions is based on geologic mapping and dating of the old flows of each volcano. The hazard zones also take into account the larger topographic features of the volcanoes that will affect the distribution of lava flows. Finally, any hazard assessment is based on the assumption that future eruptions will be similar to those in the past.

Fields:  Hazard_zone, Volcano

 

Hazard_ZoneThis is the hazard zone (1 Highest - 9 Lowest)

Volcano: Name of the volcano

 

 

1 Highest   <----------    Hazard Scale      ---------> Lowest 9

 

 


HAZARD ZONES FOR LAVA FLOWS

Zone

Percentage of area covered by lava since 1800

Percentage of area covered by lava in last 750 years

Explanation

1

greater than 25

Greater than 65

Includes the summits and rift zones of Kilauea and Mauna Loa where vents have been repeatedly active in historic time.

2

15-25

25-75

Areas adjacent to and downslope of active rift zones.

3

1-5

15-75

Areas gradationally less hazardous than Zone 2 because of greater distance from recently active vents and/or because the topography makes it less likely that flows will cover these areas.

4

about 5

less than 15

Includes all of Hualalai, where the frequency of eruptions is lower than on Kilauea and Mauna Loa. Flows typically cover large areas.

5

none

about 50

Areas currently protected from lava flows by the topography of the volcano.

6

none

very little

Same as Zone 5.

7

none

none

20 percent of this area covered by lava in the last 10,000 yrs.

8

none

none

Only a few percent of this area covered in the past 10,000 yrs.

9

none

none

No eruption in this area for the past 60,000 yrs.

 

 

 

Source:  USGS; Original scale 1:250,000

 

Availability:  Island of Hawaii.  Maps are not available for other Hawaiian islands.  However, there are no active volcanoes on other islands, so this is not an issue.

 

Vintage:  Original maps were published in 1984 and revised – 1987

 

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California PML Zones

All property/casualty insurance companies licensed to do business in California are required to report annually their PML earthquake exposure with respect to risks located in California, according to the California Dept of Insurance – Ruling 226.  This report is authorized by California Administrative Code, Title 10, Chapter 5, Subchapter 3, Article 3, Section 2307.  All property written in the state, fall into one of the following categories and is required to be reported annually.

 

Fields:  County, Zone

 

County:  This is the name of the county

Zone:  Physical definition of the boundary.  The zone returned will be one of the following:

                  

ZONE A

   SUBZONE A1

   SUBZONE A2

   SUBZONE A3

 

ZONE B

   SUBZONE B1

   SUBZONE B2

   SUBZONE B3

 

ZONE C

ZONE D

ZONE E

ZONE F

ZONE G

ZONE H

            

     

Availability:  State of California

 

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Policy Exposure Module

The Policy Exposure Module is a very powerful tool available to RiskMeter Online users.  This module not only enables users to map their policies, but it provides many features, which allow users to:

 

¨       Set radii and determine how many policies fall within a particular distance, while also displaying coverage amounts

¨       Pull up a map, which displays the location of policies

¨       Display aggregates for custom regions, such as: counties, wind regions, EQ zones, etc

¨       Identify terror targets

¨       Determine if policies fall near terror targets

¨       Determine which columns will be returned for policies

¨       Retrieve individual policy details

 

For the policies that fall in each of the custom regions, coverage totals and policy counts will be shown.  Under each section, you will see a hyperlink that says, “Show Details”.  By clicking on the link, the user will see all of the policy details.

 

The Policy Exposure report has four main sections (from top to bottom):

 

¨       Predefined region aggregates

¨       Radius aggregates

¨       Map

¨       Individual policy information

 

The user can also get information on an individual policy by using the “Get Info” button and clicking on the map.  The “Get Info” button is found above the map, to the right of the zoom tools.  To use this, first select the Get Info button, then click on an individual policy on the map.  The policy details will be displayed below the map.

 

Special Custom Features

 

¨       Terror targets may be identified by the customer

¨       The radii to aggregate can be defined by the customer

¨       The columns returned can be defined by the customer

¨       The columns to total (i.e. Coverage A, TIV, etc) can be defined by the customer

 

Contact your CDS account representative for more details.  There are many other options are available.

 

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Coastal Storm Surge
The CDS Storm Surge report identifies areas that would be flooded from storm surge during a hurricane, as well as predicted maximum storm surge heights.  The storm surge maps are based upon the well known and respected SLOSH (Sea, Lake, and Overland Surges from Hurricanes) storm surge model.  SLOSH estimates the storm surge for each category of storm based upon the wind speed, wind direction, bathymetry (underwater topography) and topography.  These areas and heights represent worst case scenarios for each area and category of storm.  The contours were generally developed by individual states using the SLOSH model.  The surge heights were then added by CDS.

The contours represent the areas that would be flooded during a hurricane of the category shown.  For example, the contour closest to the coast shows areas that would be flooded during a category 1 storm, while the second contour would represent areas flooded during a category 2 storm, etc.  The category numbers represent the height of the storm surge in feet above sea level at high tide.  Lower surges would be expected at low or slack tide.  This report can be extremely useful to carriers or agents writing excess flood, business interruption, BOP's, commercial property and coastal property.

Fields:  Min. Hurricane Category, Category 1, Category 2, Category 3, Category 4, Category 5, Notes, Surge_Score

Minimum Hurricane Category - The lowest category hurricane that would flood this area.  A category of 0 means the area will not be affected by storm surge, regardless of category

Category 1: The height (feet above sea level) of the storm surge during a category 1 hurricane. 

Category 2: The height (feet above sea level) of the storm surge during a category 2 hurricane.

Category 3: The height (feet above sea level) of the storm surge during a category 3 hurricane.

Category 4: The height (feet above sea level) of the storm surge during a category 4 hurricane.

Category 5: The height (feet above sea level) of the storm surge during a category 5 hurricane.

 

Surge_Score

Address not affected by Surge:     Surge_Score = 0-Very Low/No Risk

Address affected only by a Cat 5: Surge_Score = 1 –Low Risk

Address affected only by a Cat 4: Surge_Score = 2 – Medium/Low Risk

Address affected only by a Cat 3: Surge_Score = 3 – Medium Risk

Address affected only by a Cat 2: Surge_Score = 4 - High Risk

Address affected only by a Cat 1: Surge_Score = 5- Highest Risk

 

It is important to note that the minimum hurricane category represents the weakest hurricane that would flood a particular area, and it would be affected by a storm of this category, as well as all higher categories.  For example a location in a category 2 area will be affected by any storm from categories 2-5!  In fact, the higher the actual storm category, the worse the flooding will be! N/A means this area would not be flooded during a storm of that category. For example, a location may not be flooded unless a hurricane of category 3 or greater hits. Therefore, the area would not be affected by storm surge from a category 1 or 2 storm.

 

For some reason, the CT data was modeled combining Category 1 and Category 2 storms.  There is only a single contour in CT for category 1 and 2 storms.  This represents the area estimated to be inundated in a category 2 storm.  The area inundated in a category 1 storm would be smaller, and would represent the lower areas closer to the coast.

In some Northeastern states, there are no values for Category 5 storms.  Researchers do not believe that a category 5 storm will hit the Northeastern United States.

 

Availability: AL, CT, DE, FL, GA, HI, LA, MA, MD, ME, MS, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PR, RI, SC, TX, VA

 

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EQE Average Annual Loss

This report will provide the EQE Average Annual Loss (AAL) for a location based upon key characteristics of the building in question.  The average annual loss is the estimated amount of claims that will be paid per year based upon the long term average.  This calculation is ideal to use for pricing policies in catastrophe prone areas.  The AALs are gross losses, also known as ground up losses, as they don’t factor in deductibles, limits, etc.  In addition, AAL is also known as the average annual damage (AAD), since financial modeling isn’t being performed.  These calculations are based upon EQE’s WorldCat Enterprise(WCe) software.

 

Input Fields:  Year Built, Year Upgraded/Retrofit, Number of Buildings ,Number of Stories, Occupancy, Structure Type, Standard Deviation, Coefficient of Variation (COV), Demand Surge, Site Deductible, Buildings, Contents and Time. These fields must be filled in as accurately as possible in order to receive an accurate Average Annual Loss estimate!

 

Year Built – Year originally built

Year Upgraded/Retrofit – Year modified to meet then current hazard-specific building codes

Number of Buildings – Number of buildings (i.e. house and detached garage would be 2)

Number of Stories- Total number of stories in the building

Occupancy -See detailed descriptions below

Structure Type - See detailed descriptions below

Standard Deviation – Check this box to return the standard deviation along with the AAL.  In statistic and probability theory, standard deviation (represented by the symbol σ) shows how much variation or "dispersion" exists from the average (mean, or expected value). A low standard deviation indicates that the data points tend to be very close to the mean, whereas high standard deviation indicates that the data points are spread out over a large range of value.

Coefficient of Variation (COV) - Check this box to return the coefficient of variation along with the AAL.  The coefficient of variation (COV) is defined as the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean (Standard Deviation/Mean).  This is most useful when comparing two sets of data with different means; it’s a way to measure the relative dispersion of data sets.

Demand Surge - Check this box to include demand surge in the calculations.  Demand surge is post event inflation.  After a large disaster, construction material and labor can temporarily be in short supply, so construction costs are inflated. The  larger the impact of the event on the local economy, the larger the effect of demand surge.

Site Deductible - The site deductible is the amount that the insured will pay towards damages.  This should be entered in whole dollars.

Buildings – Value of buildings in dollars.

Contents – Value of contents in dollars.

Time – Typically the BI value in commercial policies, or the alternative living expenses in a homeowner’s policy in dollars.

 

Returned Fields:

 

Entered Values -All of the input fieldsare shown above are returned as part of the output, under the heading of EnteredValues.

Average Annual Loss (AAL) - The average annual loss based upon a 1,000 year return period.

 

 

 

 

Structure Type Descriptions:

 

Short Description

Detailed Description

ISO Fire 1 (Frame)

Buildings where the exterior walls are wood or other combustible materials are combined with other materials such as brick veneer, stone veneer, wood iron-clad, stucco on wood.

ISO Fire 2 (Joisted Masonry)

Buildings where the exterior walls are constructed of masonry materials such as adobe, brick, concrete, gypsum block, hollow concrete block, stone, tile or similar materials and where the floors and roof are combustible.

ISO Fire 3 (Noncombustible)

Buildings where the exterior walls and the floors are constructed of, and supported by, metal, asbestos, gypsum or other non-combustible materials.

ISO Fire 4(Masonry Noncombustible)

Buildings where the exterior walls and the floors are constructed of masonry materials as described in Code 2 above [adobe, brick, concrete, gypsum block, hollow concrete block, stone, tile, or similar materials] with the floors and roof of metal or other noncombustible materials.

ISO Fire 5 (Modified Fire Resistive)

Buildings where the exterior walls and the floors and roof are constructed of masonry or fire resistive material with a fire resistance rating of one hour or more but less than two hours.

ISO Fire 6 (Fire Resistive)

Buildings where the exterior walls and the floors and roof are constructed of masonry or fire resistive material with a fire resistance rating of not less than two hours.

ISO Fire 7 (Heavy Time Joisted Masonry)

Same as ISO Fire Code 2 with the following additional requirements: For Group II Causes of Loss Code 7 shall apply to buildings of heavy timber joisted masonry construction, where the horizontal levels are a minimum of 2 inches in thickness and are supported by timbers having a minimum dimension of 6 inches, and to buildings where the roof assembly is documented to have a wind uplift classification of 90 or equivalent.

ISO Fire 8 (Superior Noncombustible)

Same as ISO Fire Code 3 with the following additional requirements: For Group II Causes of Loss Code 8 shall apply to buildings of superior non-combustible construction, where the floors and roof are constructed of 2 inches of masonry on steel supports, or documented to be constructed of 22 gauge metal (or heavier) on steel supports, or documented to have a wind uplift classification of 90 or equivalent.

ISO Fire 9 (Superior Masonry Noncombustible)

Same as ISO Fire Code 4 with the following additional requirements: For Group II Causes of Loss Code 9 shall apply to buildings of superior masonry non-combustible construction, where the floors and roof are constructed of 2 inches of masonry on steel supports, or documented to be constructed of 22 gauge metal (or heavier) on steel supports, or documented to have a wind uplift classification of 90 or equivalent.

Mobile Home Not Tied Down

Typically a prefabricated timber structure constructed on a light metal frame. Not tied down to the ground.

Mobile Home Tied Down

Typically a prefabricated timber structure constructed on a light metal frame. Tied down to the ground.

Precast Concrete (Not Tilt Up)

Concrete structural elements are manufactured off-site under controlled conditions, and assembled at the site.

Concrete Tilt Up

Buildings having perimeter walls made of reinforced concrete panels that are poured on-site and are tilted up into wall position. The floors and roof typically are constructed of panelized wood connected to the perimeter walls.

Low Rise Masonry

Low rise, unreinforced masonry bearing wall buildings

Low Rise Concrete

Low rise, concrete shear wall buildings

Low Rise Steel

Low rise, light steel or metal frame buildings

High Rise Masonry

High rise, reinforced masonry shear wall with frame

High Rise Concrete

High rise, reinforced concrete shear wall with frame

High Rise Steel

High rise, heavy steel building

 

Occupancy Descriptions:

 

Name

Description

Chemical

Chemical processing facilities

Commercial

Commercial structures, primarily used for non-manufacturing operations

Construction

Structures under construction

Entertainment

Any type of eating establishment, movie theatre or sports facilities

Food & Drug

Food and drug manufacturing and processing facilities

Health Care

Health care facilities including hospitals

Heavy Industry

Heavy manufacturing facilities

High Technology

High technology manufacturing facilities including computer processing and chip manufacturing facilities

Light Industry

Other types of light industrial facilities

Parking

Parking structures

Residential

Residential structures including single and multi-family occupancies such as townhouses and apartments

Other

Other occupancies

 

 

Perils PerilsEQ Ground Shaking, Hurricane Winds

 

Availability 

EQ Ground Shaking - Entire US

Hurricane Winds – AL, CT, DE, FL, GA, LA, MA, MD, ME, MS, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, PR, RI, SC, TX, VA

 

Special Features/Options:  EQE has default values for the input values.  If you leave these blank, the default values will be used, and ** will appear after the values.  Additionally, CDS can set the defaults for each field to any specification you would like.  If the system uses default values set for your account, an * will be displayed after this value.  Also, for the occupancy and structure type, there is a value of {Don’t Know – Use Default }.  This should only be used when the values are unknown, and these values should be used, rather than just accepting the default. 

 

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EQE Probable Maximum Loss

This report will provide the EQE Probable Maximum Loss (PML) for a location based upon a few characteristics of the building.  The probable maximum loss is the estimated largest loss that will be encountered for a given return period.  The return period can be set to 100, 250 or 500 years.  This calculation is ideal to use when calculating the amount of insurance to purchase, or for determining the effects on capacity.  The PMLs are gross losses, also known as ground up losses, as they don’t factor in deductibles, limits, etc.  In addition, this is also known as the probable maximum damage (PMD), since financial modeling isn’t being performed. These calculations are based upon EQE’s WorldCat Enterprise(WCe) software.

 

Input Fields:  Year Built, Year Upgraded/Retrofit, Number of Buildings, Number of Stories, Occupancy, Structure Type, Return Period, Demand Surge, Site Deductible, Building, Contents and Time.    These fields must be filled in as accurately as possible in order to receive an accurate Probable Maximum Loss estimate!

 

Year Built – Year originally built.

Year Upgraded/Retrofit – Year modified to meet then current hazard-specific building codes.

Number of Buildings – Number of buildings (i.e. house and detached garage would be 2).

Number of Stories- Total number of stories in the building.

Occupancy -See detailed descriptions below

Structure Type - See detailed descriptions below

Return Period – Choose 100, 250 or 500 year return period.

Demand Surge - Check this box to include demand surge in the calculations.  Demand surge is post event inflation.  After a large disaster, construction material and labor can temporarily be in short supply, so construction costs are inflated.  The larger the impact of the event on the local economy, the larger the effect of demand surge.

Site Deductible - The site deductible is the amount that the insured will pay towards damages.  This should be entered in whole dollars.

Buildings – Value of buildings in dollars.

Contents – Value of contents in dollars.

Time – Typically the BI value in commercial policies, or the alternative living expenses in a homeowner’s policy in dollars.

 

 

Returned Fields:

 

Entered Values -All of the input fieldsare shown above are returned as part of the output, under the heading of EnteredValues.

Probable Maximum Loss (PML) - The fields are returned as both the dollar amount and as a percentage of value.

 

Perils:       EQ Ground Shaking, Hurricane Winds

 

Availability:  

EQ Ground Shaking - Entire US

Hurricane Winds - AL, CT, DE, FL, GA, LA, MA, MD, ME, MS, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, PR, RI, SC, TX, VA

 

 

Special Features/Options:  EQE has default values for the input values.  If you leave these blank, the default values will be used, and ** will appear after the values.  Additionally, CDS can set the defaults for each field to any specification you would like.  If the system uses default values set for your account, an * will be displayed after this value.  Also, for the occupancy and structure type, there is a value  of {Don’t Know – Use Default }.  This should only be used when the values are unknown, and these values should be used, rather than just accepting the default. 

 

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EQE Ground Shaking

Specifically geared for underwriters, this tool provides the local soil conditions, the name and distance to the controlling fault, liquefaction susceptibility and the resulting MMI at the site.  These calculations are based upon EQE’s WorldCat enterprise(WCe) software.

 

An important note on the EQE methodology for this model is it looks at faults that are active faults.  An active fault in the model is a fault that is expected to rupture with a given probability within the return period chosen.  So if a fault is not expected to rupture, within say, 100 years, and the return period chosen is 100 years, that fault will not be shown in the output.  It is statistically insignificant.  Because of this fact, known faults may not be shown in the output (because they are not expected to rupture within the return period), or different answers for the same location are possible based upon different return periods.

 

Fields:  Soil, Controlling Fault Name, Distance to Controlling Fault, Modified Mercalli Index (MMI) 100 year, MMI 250 year and MMI 500 year

 

Soil: Returns one of the following values:

 

Soil Code

Description

Sa

Hard Rock (Sa)

Sa-b

Rock and Hard Rock (Sa-b)

Sb

Rock (Sb)

Sb-c

Rock and Soft Rock (Sb-c)

Sc

Very Dense Soil and Soft Rock (Sc)

Sc-d

Soft Rock and Stiff Soil (Sc-d)

Sd

Stiff Soil (Sd)

Sd-e

Soft Soil (Sd-e)

Se

Very Soft Soil (Se)

A

Granite and Metamorphic (A)

B

Paleozoic Sedimentary (B)

C

Early Mesozoic Sedimentary (C)

CD

Mesozoic/Cretaceous Sedimentary (CD)

D

Cretaceous/Eocene Sedimentary (D)

E

Undivided Tertiary Sedimentary (E)

F

Oligocene/mid-Pliocene Sedimentary (F)

G

Pliocene/Pleistocene Sedimentary (G)

H

Tertiary Volcanic (H)

I

Quaternary Volvanic (I)

J

Saturated Alluvium (J)

K

Alluvium: water depth greater than 100ft (K)

L

Alluvium: water depth 30-100 ft (L)

LJ

Alluvium: water depth 10-30 ft (LJ)

M

Alluvuim: water depth greater than 100 ft (M)

N

Alluvuim: water depth greater than 100 ft (N)

P

Alluvium: water depth greater than 100 ft (P)

S

Artificial Fill (S)

S1

Rock-like stiff or dense soil (S1)

S2

Soft to medium stiff soil (S2)

S3

Saturated alluvium (S3)

S4

Artificial fill (S4)

00

Unknown or bad code (OO)

01

Reclaimed land (01)

02

Sand bar/sand dune (02)

03

Delta (mud, clay) (03)

04

Delta (sandy soil) (04)

05

Alluvial fan (05)

06

Volcanic ash terrace (06)

07

Sand & gravel terrace (07)

08

Rock terrace (08)

09

Hill (09)

10

Volcanic footslope (10)

11

Mountain (11)

 

 

Controlling Fault Name: Name of the fault producing the greatest damage at the site based upon a 100-year return period. (See note below)

Distance to Controlling Fault (Mi): Distance in miles from a site to the controlling fault from a group of hypothetical faults selected for analysis based upon a 100 year return period. (See note below)

*Note: Sometimes the Controlling Fault Name will be returned as "Gridded Source". This means that there is seismic activity in the area, but scientists haven't located actual faults in the area. This generally happens in areas of low seismicity. Since the location of the faults are not known, technically, the distance to fault cannot be measured. In these cases, the Distance to Controlling Fault will be returned as 999.9 miles.

Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI): This scale uses the observations of the people who experienced the earthquake to estimate its intensity. There are 12 levels of observation represented by a roman numeral equivalent. 1 (Low) – 12 (High).  See further descriptions below:

 

 

MMI Scale Definitions:

 

Mercalli Intensity
(at epicenter)

Magnitude

Witness Observations

1 (I)

1 to 2

Not felt. Marginal and long period effects of large earthquakes.

2 (II)

2 to 3

Felt by persons at rest, on upper floors, or favorably placed.

3 (III)

3 to 4

Felt indoors. Hanging objects swing. Vibration like passing of light trucks. Duration estimated. May not be recognized as an earthquake.

4 (IV)

4

Hanging objects swing. Vibration like passing of heavy trucks; or sensation of a jolt like a heavy ball striking the walls. Standing motor cars rock. Windows, dishes, doors rattle. Glasses clink. Crockery clashes. In the upper range of IV, wooden walls and frame creak.

5 (V)

4 to 5

Felt outdoors; direction estimated. Sleepers wakened. Liquids disturbed, some spilled. Small unstable objects displaced or upset. Doors swing, close, open. Shutters, pictures move. Pendulum clocks stop, start, change rate.

6 (VI)

5 to 6

Felt by all. Many frightened and run outdoors. Persons walk unsteadily. Windows, dishes, glassware broken. Knickknacks, books, etc., off shelves. Pictures off walls. Furniture moved or overturned. Weak plaster and masonry D (See masonry definitions below) cracked. Small bells ring (church, school). Trees, bushes shaken (visibly, or heard to rustle).

7 (VII)

6

Difficult to stand. Noticed by drivers of motor cars. Hanging objects quiver. Furniture broken. Damage to masonry D, including cracks. Weak chimneys broken at roof line. Fall of plaster, loose bricks, stones, tiles, cornices (also unbraced parapets and architectural ornaments). Some cracks in masonry C. Waves on ponds; water turbid with mud. Small slides and caving in along sand or gravel banks. Large bells ring. Concrete irrigation ditches damaged.

8 (VII)

6 to 7

Steering of motor cars affected. Damage to masonry C; partial collapse. Some damage to masonry B; none to masonry A. Fall of stucco and some masonry walls. Twisting, fall of chimneys, factory stacks, monuments, towers, elevated tanks. Frame houses moved on foundations if not bolted down; loose panel walls thrown out. Decayed piling broken off. Branches broken from trees. Changes in flow or temperature of springs and wells. Cracks in wet ground and on steep slopes.

9 (IX)

7

General panic. Masonry D destroyed; masonry C heavily damaged, sometimes with complete collapse; masonry B seriously damaged. (General damage to foundations.) Frame structures, if not bolted, shifted off foundations. Frames racked. Serious damage to reservoirs. Underground pipes broken. Conspicuous cracks in ground. In alluvial areas sand and mud ejected, earthquake fountains, sand craters.

10 (X)

7 to 8

Most masonry and frame structures destroyed with their foundations. Some well-built wooden structures and bridges destroyed. Serious damage to dams, dikes, embankments. Large landslides. Water thrown on banks of canals, rivers, lakes, etc. Sand and mud shifted horizontally on beaches and flat land. Rails bent slightly.

11 (XI)

8

Rails bent greatly. Underground pipelines completely out of service.

12 (XII)

8 or greater

Damage nearly total. Large rock masses displaced. Lines of sight and level distorted. Objects thrown into the air.

 

 

Masonry Definitions:

 

Masonry A: Good workmanship, mortar, and design; reinforced, especially laterally, and bound together by using steel, concrete, etc.; designed to resist lateral forces.
Masonry B: Good workmanship and mortar; reinforced, but not designed in detail to resist lateral forces.
Masonry C: Ordinary workmanship and mortar; no extreme weaknesses like failing to tie in at corners, but neither reinforced nor designed against horizontal forces.
Masonry D: Weak materials, such as adobe; poor mortar; low standards of workmanship; weak horizontally.

                               

Full descriptions are from: Richter, C.F., 1958. Elementary Seismology. W.H. Freeman and Company, San Francisco, pp. 135-149; 650-653.

 

Availability: Entire US

 

 

 

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Straight Line Wind
This report gauges the potential for damage for any location in the Continental US from straight line winds (SLW).  It is based on National Climatic Data Center figures for eighteen years (1990-1992; 1996-2010;the period 1993-1995 did not have lat/longs associated with it so the data could not be used). Straight-line winds can cause damage to trees and property with wind gusts as forceful as a tornado. These winds give almost no warning and are unpredictable. Straight-line winds are caused by a storm front, and can have gusts of 100 mph or more. They often strike without warning and cover a much larger area than a tornado. Particularly large straight-line winds can be known as a derecho (the Spanish word for straight).  Straight Line Winds above 57 MPH are considered severe by the National Weather Service.  Only winds of this strength are included in the model.

 

Fields:  SLW Scale, SLW Percentile, Storms per Year and SLW Score

 

SLW Scale:  This is a number between 1-100 that represents the frequency of straight line wind events.  Currently, the national average is 8 (equates to 2 straight line wind events per year), so any SLW Scale number higher than that is more likely to have an event occur.

SLW Percentile:  This is a percentile score that compares your lookup to the rest of the US.  For example a score of 10 means that it is in the lowest 10% of all areas in the US, or a score of 80 would mean that it is in the top 20% of all areas in the US. Being in the 50% percentile means this is the median value.

Storms per Year:  This is the average number of straight line wind events per year for the area. 

SLW Score:  This score is based upon the straight line wind events per year.  The scores can be interpreted as follows:

 

0                     No Risk - No events Reported

1                     Below Average Risk - Less than 1.5 events per year on average

2                     Average Risk – 1.5-2.5 events per year on average

3                     Elevated Risk – 2.5-5 events per year on average

4                     High Risk – 5 to 15 events per year on average

5                     Extreme Risk – More than 15 events per year on average

 

Availability:  Continental United States.

 

 

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Roof Age

This report uses building permit data to determine the age of a roof.  It can be used for both homes and commercial properties.  If no permit is found, the report uses other data on the amount of permit data and year build to estimate the age of the roof.  If there is no coverage for a given area, the user will not be charged.

 

Fields:  Roof coverage begin date, roof coverage end date, year built, (minimum) roof age, roof calculation method.

 

Roof Coverage Begin Date - Earliest date that permit data is available for the jurisdiction

Roof Coverage End Date - Latest date that permit data is available for the jurisdiction

Year Built – The year the structure was built (this will not show if a permit is found)

Roof Age – The age of the roof in years.  If no permit is found, it will be shown as minimum roof age, as we believe the roof is at least this old. This is based upon the year built and the coverage begin date

Roof Calculation Method – The method by which the roof age is calculated.  Possible values are: byCoverageDate, byPermitDate, and byYrBuilt.

 

Availability: Entire US.  However, permit data is not available for every jurisdiction.

 

 

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Flood Risk Score

This report provides a Flood Risk Score in addition to the flood risk factors used to create the score.

 

CoreLogic Flood Risk Score (FRS) is an advanced risk assessment tool that combines federal flood zones with hydrological science and critical risk data. Elevation and comprehensive hydrology data, combined with an internal database of over 90,000 dams, levees and customized flood analysis (for example, Howard Hanson Dam in Washington) provide an extensive flood risk management solution.

Fields: Risk Score, Risk Rating, Flood Zone, Elevation Variance Feet, Property Elevation Feet, Water Surface Elevation Feet, Distance One Hundred Year Flood Plain Feet, Distance One Hundred Year Flood Plain Note, Distance Five Hundred Year Flood Plain Feet, Distance Five Hundred Year Flood Plain Note, Dam Distance Miles, Levee Distance Miles, Subwatershed Name, Subwatershed Code, Additional Impact Areas, Comments, Community Name, Community Number, Map Panel, Map Suffix, Map Date, Original FIRM Date, Participation Status, Coastal Barrier Date, State County FIPS Code 

Risk Score: Flood Risk Score based on a sliding scale from 10-100.

Risk Rating: Flood Risk Score rating: Very Low | Low | Moderate | High | Very High | Extreme.

Flood Zone: Flood zone based on current FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM).

Elevation Variance Feet: A variance calculated in feet between the Property Elevation Feet and Water Surface Elevation Feet.

Property Elevation Feet: Ground elevation in feet of the property using the location coordinates and is component for deriving the Elevation Variance Feet.

Water Surface Elevation Feet: Serves as the proxy for the elevation of the 100-year flood and is component for deriving the Elevation Variance Feet.

Distance One Hundred Year Flood Plain Feet: Distance in feet between the property and the boundary of the 100-year flood zone located in the same catchment or subwatershed

Distance One Hundred Year Flood Plain Feet Note: Note provided in absence of a distance.

Distance Five Hundred Year Flood Plain Feet: Distance in feet between the property and the boundary of the 500-year flood zone.

Distance Five Hundred Year Flood Plain Feet Note: Note provided in the absence of a distance.

Dam Distance Miles: Dam distance in miles for dams located within the same subwatershed, have a hazard value of Significant (“S”) or High (“H”) and are within 7 miles of the property location.

Levee Distance Miles: Levee distance in miles for levees located within the same subwatershed and within 7 miles of the property location.

Subwatershed Name: Name of the subwatershed in which the property is located.

Subwatershed Code: Hydrological Unit Code (HUC) in which the property is located.

Additional Impact Areas: Additional impact areas that contribute to the overall flood risk. These additional impact areas are currently defined: Tsunami Impact Area, California Dam Impact Area, FEMA Designated Levee Protected Area, or Howard A Hanson Dam Impact Area.

Comments: Comment provided when a Risk Score is unavailable.

Community Name: Name of the political subdivision used for identification by the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

Community Number: Six digit number identifying each NFIP community.

Map Panel: Two-to-four-digit number assigned by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) on the current FIRM. 

Map Suffix: Letter that follows the FIRM Panel Number indicating the version of the current map.

Map Date: Map date of the current FIRM (in the format:  YYYY-MM-DD).

Original FIRM Date: Original map date of the first FIRM (in the format: YYYY-MM-DD).

Participation Status: National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) participation status of the community in which the property is located. The possible values are - followed by the explanations: "R" is Regular, "E" is Emergency, "N" is Non-Participating, "S" is Suspended, “P” is Probation.

Coastal Barrier Date: Coastal Barrier Resource Area date (in the format: YYYY-MM-DD). 

State County FIPS Code: Five-digit state and county FIPS code.

 

Availability: Entire US where FEMA flood maps are available.

 

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Guaranteed Flood Determinations

This report shows whether a property location is located within a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA).  For properties that are near a flood zone boundary change they are manually researched to ensure accuracy.  The property location is processed thru an extensive database of digital maps, parcel boundaries and previously determined properties to provide a comprehensive and accurate flood determination. 

 

Fields: SFHA, Flood Zone, Community Name, Community Number, County(ies), Map Number, Map Panel, Map Date, Original FIRM Date, Participation Status, LOMA/LOMR Date, CBRA/OPA Date, Comments, Order Number, Report Date

 

SFHA: In or Out of 100-Year floodplain.

Flood Zone: Flood zone based on current FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM).

Community Name: Name of the political subdivision used for identification by the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

Community Number: Six digit number identifying each NFIP community.

County(ies): County or counties identified within the NFIP community.

Map Number: Five digit code that identifies the county and may includes a “C” that indicates countywide mapping.

Map Panel: Two-to-four-digit number and suffix assigned by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) on the current FIRM. 

Map Date: Map date of the current FIRM (in the format:  YYYY-MM-DD).

Original FIRM Date: Original map date of the first FIRM (in the format: YYYY-MM-DD).

Participation Status: National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) participation status of the community in which the property is located. The possible values are – Regular | Emergency | Non-Participating | Suspended | Probation

LOMA/LOMR Date: Letter of Map Amendment or Letter of Map Revision date (in the format: YYYY-MM-DD).

CBRA/OPA Date: Coastal Barrier Resource Area or Otherwise Protected Area date (in the format: YYYY-MM-DD).

Comments: Comments provided about determination.

Order Number: 10 digit reference id assigned to the determination.

Report Date: Date of determination (in the format: YYYY-MM-DD).

 

Availability: Entire US and US Territories where FEMA flood maps are available. 

 

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Wildfire Risk Score

This report provides information about a property location’s wildfire risk.  CoreLogic Wildfire Risk Score data utilizes a combination of brushfire data and proximity to higher risk areas to provide an accurate assessment of a property’s wildfire exposure.  

 

Fields: Risk Score, Risk Description, Brushfire Risk Level, Brushfire Nearest High or Very High Risk Level, Brushfire Preburn Risk Description, Brushfire Distance High or Very High Risk Feet, Firebreak Land Use Density Class, Firebreak Land Use Density Level, Firebreak Distance Wildland Feet

 

Risk Score: Wildfire risk score ranked from 1-100. A higher score indicates higher wildfire risk.

Risk Description: Brushfire risk rating. Possible values are: NA | Agriculture | Urban | Low | Moderate | High |

Very High.

Brushfire Risk Level: Brushfire risk numeric rank (0-4). A higher value indicates higher brushfire risk.

0 = NA | 1 = Low; Agriculture; Urban | 2 = Moderate | 3 = High | 4 = Very High.

Brushfire Nearest High or Very High Risk Level: Nearest “High” or “Very High” brushfire risk zone identified based on distance from property location. -1 = no brushfire “High” or “Very High” risk areas within 10 miles |

 3 = High Risk | 4 = Very High Risk.

Brushfire Preburn Risk Description: Preburn brushfire risk rating. Possible values are: NA | Low | Urban | Agriculture | Moderate | High | Very High.

Brushfire Distance High or Very High Risk Feet: Distance in feet to nearest “High” or “Very High” brushfire risk zone. -1 = no Brushfire “High” or “Very High” risk areas within 10 miles.

Firebreak Land Use Density Class: Land use density classification. Possible values are:  Agriculture | Low Density Residential | Medium Density Residential | High Density Residential | Scattered Residential | Urban | Urban Non-Residential | Water | Wildland.

Firebreak Land Use Density Level: Land use density numeric rank (1-9).

Firebreak Distance Wildland Feet: Distance in feet to nearest wildland area. -1 = no wildland within 10 miles.

Availability: AK, AZ, CA, CO, FL, ID, MT, NM, NV, OK, OR, TX, UT, WA and WY 

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Coastal Storm

 

Although many storm hazards are associated with hurricanes, storm surge flooding is known by experts to be the primary cause of hurricane property damage along the Atlantic coast, Gulf of Mexico and—under the right conditions—even inland waterways. In a matter of minutes, storm surge resulting from hurricanes can wipe out homes and businesses—including the comprehensive health of your portfolio. CoreLogic Coastal Storm data can help provide an accurate assessment of storm surge risk.   

 

Fields: Risk Description, Risk Score, Intense Hurricane Yearly Probability In County, Intense Hurricane Yearly Probability In Region, Intense Hurricane 50-Year Probability In County, Intense Hurricane 50-Year Probability In County, Intense Hurricane 50-Year Probability In Region, Hurricane Yearly Probability In County, Hurricane Yearly Probability In Region, Hurricane 50-Year Probability In County, Hurricane 50-Year Probability In County, Hurricane 50-Year Probability In Region, Named Storm Yearly Probability In County, Named Storm Yearly Probability In Region, Named Storm 50-Year Probability In County, Named Storm 50-Year Probability In County, Named Storm 50-Year Probability In Region, Storm Surge Category 1 Water Depth Feet, Storm Surge Category 2 Water Depth Feet, Storm Surge Category 3 Water Depth Feet, Storm Surge Category 4 Water Depth Feet, Storm Surge Category 5.  

 

      Risk Description: Storm surge risk rating. Possible values are: Water | Low | Moderate | High | Very High | Extreme.

      Risk Score: Storm surge risk score ranked from 0-6. A higher score indicates higher storm surge risk.

      Intense Hurricane Yearly Probability In County: Yearly probability of a Category 3-5 Hurricane making landfall in county. Scale of 0-100%.

      Intense Hurricane Yearly Probability In Region: Yearly probability of a Category 3-5 Hurricane making landfall in region. Scale of 0-100%.

      Intense Hurricane 50-Year Probability In County: 50-Year probability of a Category 3-5 Hurricane making landfall in county. Scale of 0-100%.

      Intense Hurricane 50-Year Probability In Region: 50-Year probability of a Category 3-5 Hurricane making landfall in region. Scale of 0-100%.

      Hurricane Yearly Probability In County: Yearly probability of any Category 1-5 Hurricane making landfall in county. Scale of 0-100%.

      Hurricane Yearly Probability In Region: Yearly probability of any Category 1-5 Hurricane making landfall in region. Scale of 0-100%.

      Hurricane 50-Year Probability In County: 50-Year probability of any Category 1-5 Hurricane making   landfall in county. Scale of 0-100%.

      Hurricane 50-Year Probability In Region: 50-Year probability of any Category 1-5 Hurricane making   landfall in region. Scale of 0-100%.

      Named Storm Yearly Probability In County: Yearly probability of a Named Storm making landfall in county. Scale of 0-100%.

      Named Storm Yearly Probability In Region: Yearly probability of a Named Storm making landfall in region. Scale of 0-100%.

      Named Storm 50-Year Probability In County: 50-Year probability of a Named Storm making landfall in county. Scale of 0-100%.

      Named Storm 50-Year Probability In Region: 50-Year probability of a Named Storm making landfall in region. Scale of 0-100%.

      Storm Surge Category 1 Water Depth Feet: Water depth of Category 1 Hurricane in feet.

      Storm Surge Category 2 Water Depth Feet: Water depth of Category 2 Hurricane in feet.

      Storm Surge Category 3 Water Depth Feet: Water depth of Category 3 Hurricane in feet.

      Storm Surge Category 4 Water Depth Feet: Water depth of Category 4 Hurricane in feet.

      Storm Surge Category 5 Water Depth Feet: Water depth of Category 5 Hurricane in feet.

 

.Availability: AL, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, LA, MA, MD, ME, MS, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, SC, TX, VA

 

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Wind Probability

Damaging winds, defined as those greater than 65 knots (74.8 miles per hour), represent one of the most significant sources of loss for both Property & Casualty and Commercial Lines insurance providers. CoreLogic has developed a comprehensive probability layer providing the 10-year probability for damaging straight-line and tornadic wind events for each cell covering the contiguous United States. Also included is the 100-Year probability of hurricane-based winds and whether the location is in a Special Wind Region.

 

Fields: Hurricane Wind Probability Risk Description, Hurricane Wind Probability Risk Level, Hurricane Wind 100-Year Probability, Straight Line Wind Probability Risk Description, Straight Line Wind Probability Risk Level, Straight Line Wind  10-Year Probability, Tornado Wind Probability Description, Tornado Wind Probability Risk Level, Tornado Wind 10-Year Probability, Is In Special Wind Area..     

 

      Hurricane Wind Probability Risk Description: Possible risk descriptions returned:  Very Low | Low | Moderate | High | Very High | Extreme.

      Hurricane Wind Probability Risk Level:  Numeric risk level from 1-12 where 1 is Very Low and 12 is Extreme.

      Hurricane Wind 100-Year Probability:  Probability of Hurricane-force windstorm within 100 years (0.000-1.000; where 1.0=100%).

      Straight Line Wind Risk Description: Possible risk descriptions returned:  Very Low | Low | Moderate | High | Very High | Extreme.

      Straight Line Wind Probability Risk Level:  Numeric risk level from 1-12 where 1 is Very Low and 12 is Extreme.

.     Straight Line Wind 10-Year Probability:  Probability of Straight-line windstorm within 10 years (0.000-1.000; where 1.0=100%).

      Tornado Wind Probability Risk Description: Possible risk descriptions returned:  Very Low | Low | Moderate | High | Very High | Extreme.

      Tornado Wind Probability Risk Level:   Numeric risk level from 1-12 where 1 is Very Low and 12 is Extreme.

      Tornado Wind 10-Year Probability:  Probability of Tornadic windstorm within 10 years (0.000-1.000; where 1.0=100%).

      Is In Special Wind Area:  Location is in Special Wind Region.

 

Availability:  Contiguous United States

 

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Hail Probability

For the majority of insurers, hail represents the largest single loss in total annual claims. As an unpredictable threat of large thunderstorms, hail can cause extensive damage to automobiles, residential, and commercial properties. CoreLogic has developed a comprehensive 10-year damaging hail (hailstones greater than one inch) probability layer for the contiguous United States. Hail data used in the CoreLogic Hail Probability Layer is derived from the NOAA NCDC data based on observations of point hail events greater than one inch in diameter from 1980–2010.

 

Fields: Risk Description, Risk Level, 10-Year Probability.  

 

      Risk Description: Possible risk descriptions returned: Very Low | Low | Moderate | High | Very High | Extreme.    

Risk Level: Hail storm probability risk level.  Numeric risk level from 1-12 where 1 is Very Low and 12 is Extreme.     

10-Year Probability: 10-Year probability of a hail event occurring.    

 

Availability:  Contiguous United States

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Hail Insight™

Hail Insight™ is a precise solution that enables risk selection around one of the most misunderstood problems that carriers face today: The Roof Problem.

 

Powered by historical hail event data, Hail Insight integrates address-specific hail risk scores to determine pre-existing hail damage at the property level. This provides insight into a property's roof condition which was previously unknown.

 

Hail Insight provides the data necessary to solve two issues-the lack of information on roof condition and the questionable accuracy of policyholder-submitted roof information, which, until now, carriers have been forced to use.

 

Historical hail event data can truly help carriers determine a property's roof condition and pre-existing hail damage. Armed with this insight, carriers can utilize hail event-based risk scores couple with roof age to proactively optimize condition-related roof losses.

 

Fields: Pre-Existing Hail Score, Hail Events 1.00"-2.00" in Diameter, Hail Events > 2.00" in Diameter, Most Recent Hail Date, Largest Hail Event Date, Historical Search Requested.

 

      Pre-Existing Hail Score: Hail score provides a value of 0-10.

Hail Events 1.00"-2.00" in Diameter: The number of hail events where hail size identified was between 1 and 2 inches in diameter based on date range provided.

Hail Events > 2.00" in Diameter: The number of hail events where hail size identified was greater than 2 inches in diameter based on date range provided.

Most Recent Hail Date: Most recent date of a hail event that had hail size of 0.75" or greater.

Largest Hail Event Date: Date when the largest hail event was recorded.

Historical Search Requested: Date range for which Hail Insight search was conducted. RiskMeter Default is 36 months.

 

Availability:  United States

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 Mine Subsidence

Mine subsidence is the movement of the ground surface that results from the collapse of underground mining operations. In active underground mining operations, subsidence can occur concurrently with the mining operation in a predictable manner. In abandoned mines, however, it may be impossible to predict if and when subsidence will occur.

Mine subsidence can generally be classified as either sinkhole subsidence or trough subsidence. Ground movement within a subsidence sinkhole or trough can result in damage to any structure or feature that may be present including buildings, road and underground utilities.

 

Fields: Distance Nearest Mine Feet, Type Of Mine.     

 

      Distance Nearest Mine Feet: Distance in feet to the nearest high mine subsidence high risk area within 10 miles of location. 

      Type Of Mine: Type of nearest mine. Possible values are: Brine | Brine Operation | Existing Subsidence | Geothermal | Leach | Surface-Underground | Underground | Well.

 

Availability:  Entire US with exception of FL and HI

 

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Lightning Risk Score

This report provides information about a property location’s lightning risk.  Lightning Risk Score utilizes a comprehensive data set of recorded lightning strikes across the continental United States from 2005-2012.  By evaluating the frequency of data strikes in specific areas, this report provides a lightning risk assessment featuring an intuitive risk score.

 

Fields: Risk Score, Risk Description, Maximum Daily Strikes, Frequency of Daily Strikes, Average Yearly Strikes, Annual Strike Density.  

 

Risk Score: Lightning Risk Score based on cloud-to-ground lightning strikes on a sliding scale from 0-100.

Risk Description: Lightning Risk Score rating derived from score:  Minimal | Low | Moderate | High | Extreme.

Maximum Daily Strikes: The maximum number of daily strikes that occurred on a single day in the same 250-square meter grid cell in which the property is located.   

Frequency Of Daily Strikes: The frequency of daily strikes is the average annual number of days with strikes in each grid cell. This gives a general baseline for lightning frequency in any location.

Average Yearly Strikes: Averaged yearly strike density in the same 250-square meter grid cell in which the property is located. 

Annual Strike Density: Total number of lightning strikes in the same 250-square meter grid cell in which the   property is located for the designated year.

Availability: Continental United States.  No data available for HI or AK.

Source:  WSI

 

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Major System Permits

 

The Major System Permits Report provides building, electrical mechanical and plumbing permit data for a specific property. This underwriting and data verification tool provides insurers with need-to-know property history intelligence on residential and commercial structures. It provides summary information on many updates affecting building, electrical, mechanical, and plumbing systems for a property to validate application points, uncover hidden loss history, improve risk assessment and reduce inspection time.

 

Fields: Building Permits, Building Permit Last Issued, Electrical Permits, Electrical Permit Last Issued, Mechanical Permits, Mechanical Permit Last Issued, Plumbing Permits, Plumbing Permit Last Issued, Year Built Date, Permit Coverage Begin Date, Permit Coverage End Date, Is Reliably Permitted.  

       

Building Permits: Total number of building permits found.

Building Permit Last Issued: Date of last building permit issued.

Building Permit Enforcement: Yes or No response indicating confidence that the geographic area in question reliably issues and records building permits.

Electrical Permits: Total number of electrical permits found.

Electrical Permit Last Issued: Date of last electrical permit issued.

Electrical Permit Enforcement: Yes or No response indicating confidence that the geographic area in question reliably issues and records electrical permits.

Mechanical Permits: Total number of mechanical permits found.

Mechanical Permit Last Issued: Date of last mechanical permit issued.

Mechanical Permit Enforcement: Yes or No response indicating confidence that the geographic area in question reliably issues and records mechanical permits.

Plumbing Permits: Total number of plumbing permits found.

Plumbing Permit Last Issued: Date of last plumbing permit issued.

Plumbing Permit Enforcement: Yes or No response indicating confidence that the geographic area in question reliably issues and records plumbing permits.

Year Built Date: Year built or estimated year built date based on permit coverage.

Permit Coverage Begin Date: Date when permit data began being collected.  

Permit Coverage End Date: Date when permit data was last collected.

 

Availability:  Entire United States 

Source: BuildFax

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Premium Tax

Insurance companies use this data to assign the proper tax jurisdiction for policy premium taxes. A number of states assess premium taxes that do not conform to ZIP Code boundaries. Adding to the complexity, states like Florida assess these taxes based on police or fire districts.

The CoreLogic Premium Tax Layer contains information for 20 states and is provided at the state, county, municipal and fire district level (where applicable). The municipality data contains boundaries for cities, towns, villages, and boroughs.

Fields: City Class Code, City Name, City Type, County Name, Date Annexed, Date Updated, Date Verified, Distance To Boundary Feet, Fire District Name, GNIS Feature ID, Incorporation Flag, Place FIPS Code, State County FIPS Code, State Name, State Special Tax Code, Tax Authority FIPS Code, Tax Authority Name.  

City Class Code: The Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 55-3 Code for populated places, primary county divisions, American Indian and Alaska Native areas, and other location entities under the jurisdiction of the United States.

City Name: The name of the city.

City Type: The type of city (the Census-defined geographic area), such as borough, city, town, village, or CDP (Census Designated Place).

County Name: The name of the county.

Date Annexed: The date (in the format: MMYYYY) indicates vintage of most recent available boundary data or date of the most recent boundary data.

Date Updated: The date (in the format: MMYYYY) indicates the month and year of the most recent update to the city boundaries or data for the location.

Date Verified: The date (in the format: MMYYYY) when the boundary information was verified.

Distance To Boundary Feet: An integer showing the distance from the location to the tax boundary.

Fire District Name: The fire district name, if applicable.

GNIS Feature ID: The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) feature ID code.

Incorporation Flag: A number indicating whether the location is an incorporated place, as defined by GNIS. The possible values are:

·         "0" is unincorporated

·         "1" is an incorporated place

Place FIPS Code: The five-digit FIPS code for the place.

State County FIPS Code: The five-digit FIPS code for the state and county.

State Name: The name of the state.

State Special Tax Codes: Special tax code information, if applicable.

Tax Authority FIPS Code: The 10-digit FIPS code for the taxing authority.

Tax Authority Name: The name of the taxing authority.

 

Availability:  Premium Tax data is currently available for the following states: AL, AZ, CA, DE, FL, GA, IL, KY, LA, MD, MN, MO, MS, NC, ND, NJ, NY, PA, SC, and WV.

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